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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Piermont, New Hampshire"

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REPORT 



OF THE OFFICERS 



PIERMONT, N.H 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 3 1 

2007 



EMERGENCY SERVICES 



Any Time of Day or Night 



Ambulance 



Fire 



Police 



Dial-911 



When dispatcher answers, give your 

Name 

Problem 

Location and 

Your Phone Number 



The needed help will start out immediately 
to where you are 



This Town Report 



Is Dedicated To 




"Lou "Hobbs 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF PIERMONT 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



For the Year Ending December 3 1 , 2007 



Index - See inside front cover for emergencies 

Annual Report of the Officers of the Town of Piermont 

Animal Control Report 59 

Auditor's Report 34 

Budget - Detailed 15 

Cemetery Trust Fund 83 

Cemetery Trustees Report 80 

Clark Trust Fund Report ...82 

Comparative Statement 30 

Conservation Commission 70 

Equipment - Capital Reserve Fund 80 

Financial Report 34 

Fire Department - Proposed Budget , 64 

Fire Chiefs Report 60 

Forest Fire Warden 65 

Historical Society Report 74 

Library Budget 58 

Library Financial Statement 56 

Library Report 54 

Orders Drawn by Selectmen 40 

Planning Board 67 

Police Report 61 

Recreation Committee 73 

Recycling Transfer & Budget 77 

Recycling Report 75 

Revaluation Capital Reserve 81 

Road Agent's Report Program 47 

Schedule of Town Property 33 

Selectmen's Report 35 

Sewage District .' 52 

Summary of Inventory Valuation 31 

Summary of Budget 15 

Tax Collector's Report 36 

Town Building Reserve Fund 81 

Town Bridges Capital Reserve 81 

Town Meeting Minutes 16 

Town Clerk's Report 36 

Town Warrant 8 

Treasurer's Report 39 

Trustees of Trust Funds Report 79 

Vital Statistics 84 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 69 



Requests for Participation and Donations 

Conn River Joint Commission 78 

Cottage Hospital 91 

Lower Cohase Regional Chamber of Commerce 86 

RayButon 91 

Senior Citizen Council 96 

UNH Cooperative Extension 93 

Upper Valley Hazardous Waste Comm 99 

Upper Valley River Subcommittee 78 

. Visiting Nurse Alliance of Vt. & NH 88 

White Mt. Mental Health 95 

School District Report 100 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Selectmen 


Robert Lang, Chair (2010) 


989-5684 




MarkFagnant, (2009) 


272-4349 




William Daley, (2008) 


272-9186 


Town Clerk 


Linda Lambert (2009) 


272-5848 


Treasurer 


James Lambert 


272-5848 


Tax Collector 


Linda Lambert (2009) 


272-5848 


Road Agent 


Christopher Davidson (2008) 


272-9110 


Police Chief 


Robert Garvin 




Fire Chief 


Keith Brick 


272-9308 


Forest Fire Warden 


Roy Belyea (2009) 


272-4886 


Health Officer 


Alex Medlicott 


272-4835 


Emergency Management 


Wayne Godfrey 


272-5802 


Animal Control Officer 


Wayne Godfrey 


272-5802 


Supervisors-Checklist 


VeaJenks(2010) 


272-4838 




Russell Woodard (2012) 


272-4378 




Peggy Fullerton (2008) 


989-3933 


Trustee Trust Fund 


Frederick Shipman, Chr. (2008) 


272-4938 




Jean Underhill (2010) 


272-9756 




Abby Metcalf (2008)(one year) 


272-4372 


Moderator 


Arnold Shields (2008) 


989-3171 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



Joyce Tompkins, (2009) 

Helga Mueller, (2008) 

Stephanie Gordon, (2008) 

Betty Hall, (2009) 

Margaret Ladd, Librarian 

Jim Meddaugh , Assistant Librarian 



Marian Shields (2009) 

Joe Medlicott (2010) 

Nancy Sandell (2010) 



ZONING ADMINISTRATOR 



Terry Robie 



272-4901 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 



Fred Shipman, Chr. (2010) 
Steve Daly (2009) 
Helga Mueller (2008) 
Robert Lang, Alternate (2008) 



George Schmid (2010) 
Charlie Brown (2008) 



PLANNING BOARD 

Peter Labounty (2009) Edward French (2008) 

Fred Shipman (2008) Bill Morris, Chr. (2010) 

Suzanne Woodward (20 1 0) Peggy Fullerton (2008) 

Mark Fagnant, Ex-Officio Jean Daley (2009) 
Helga Mueller, Secretary(2009) 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Joe Medlicott, Pres. Helga Mueller 

Frederick Shipman Anna Williams. 

Lloyd Hall Betty Hall 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Helga Mueller, Chr. (2008) Charles Grant (20 1 0) 

David Ritchie (20 1 0) Eric Underhill (2008) 

Bill Morris (2009) Asa Metcalf-Forrester 
Ernie Hartley (2009) 



RECYCLING CENTER & TRANSFER STATION 

Wayne Godfrey, Manager 
John Metcalf, Assistant Manager 






WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 11, 2008 

TOWN OF PIERMONT 

Polls will open at 10:00 AM in the old church building to vote on 
articles one and two. Polls will close at 6:30 PM. Town meeting will 
continue in Piermont Village School at 7:30 to continue with the remaining 
Articles of Town business. 

ARTICLE ONE: (By Official Ballot) To vote by Official Ballot for 
the following Town officers: 

One Selectman term of three years 

Road Agent term of three year 

A Treasurer term of one year 

A Trustee of Trust Funds term of three years 

A Trustee of Trust Funds term of one year 

Moderator term of two years 

Two Library Trustees term of three years 

Supervisor of Checklist term of six years 

ARTICLE TWO: To raise and appropriate $646,438. Appearing in 
the Town Budget as necessary to defray Town Charges for the 
ensuing year, divided as follows and subject to any adjustment which 
may be voted upon at this Meeting: 

ITEM BUDGETED CHARGE 

Ambulance, Fire and Police Dispatching Services 8,61 1 

Auditor Expense 9,500 

Cemeteries (see note 1) 1 1,200 

Contingency 2,000 

Election/Registration 5,000 

Fire Dept. & Fast Squad 38,480 

Fire Truck Payment 38,836 

Highway Subsidy (see note 3) 32,376 

Highways and Bridges- Summer Maintenance 62,800 

Highways and Bridges- Winter Maintenance 65,000 

Insurance 9,500 

Interest 5,000 



8 









Legal Expenses 


10,000 


Library (see note 5) 


42,865 


Memorial Day 


1,500 


Miscellaneous 


500 


Officers Expenses 


25,000 


Officers Salaries 


54,000 


Planning Board and Zoning Board of Adjustment 


10,000 


Police Dept. 


46,684 


Public Welfare 


15,000 


Recreation and Swimming Pool 


7,000 


Solid Waste Disposal (see note 2) 


39,908 


Street Lights and Blinker 


5,500 


Tax Maps 


800 


Testing Monitoring Wells 


11,000 


Town Buildings 


25,000 


Upper Valley Ambulance 


10,635 


Village Sewer System (Note 4) 


34,243 


Conservation Commission (new) 


2000 


Assessors Pickups (new) 


2,500 


Revaluation Payment (new) 


12,000 


Shelving In Safe (new) 


2,000 



TOTAL TOWN CHARGES 646,438 

Note 1: Town raises by taxes $6,800; $3,500 comes from 
Cemetery Trust Funds, $900 comes from user fees and surplus in 

» Operating Account. 
Note 2: The Town expects to receive $18,000 from the sale of 
bags and other charges to offset this cost. 

Note 3: This amount is received from the State for use by the 
Highway Department. 

Note 4: This entire amount is anticipated to come from user fees, 
with no money raised by taxes. NHDES -a 30% Aid Grant which equals to 
$8,500 per year 

Note 5: $9365 from Library Trust Funds and $33,500 raised with 
taxes 






ARTICLE THREE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500. for the benefit of CASA (Court Appointed 
Special Advocates) of New Hampshire. 

ARTICLE FOUR: To see if Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $500.00 for the Woodsville Area Fourth of July Committee. 

ARTICLE FIVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $173,100. to reconstruct + 2000 linear feet by 20' 
wide of Indian Pond Road. The project to begin at the end of pavement 
(near Hamilton's residence) and proceed north, the scope of work to 
contain; pulverizing existing pavement, geo textile fabrics, select material, 
drainage improvements and placements. Placement to consist of 2" 
compacted base coarse and 1" compacted wear coarse. This Article 
coincides with the 10 year plan. 

The Majority of Selectmen DoNot recommend this Article. 

ARTICLE SIX: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $70,000. to reconstruct ^750 linear feet of Indian 
Pond Road. This project's location is the same as ARTICLE FIVE and is 
provided to offer a scaled down version of such. If ARTICLE FIVE is 
approved this Article should be voted down and defeated. 

The Majority of Selectmen DoNot recommend this Article. 

ARTICLE SEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $50,000. to be paid into a new Barton Road Bridge 
Expendable Trust Fund. This project coincides with the 10 year plan for 
a 2011 target date. 

The Majority of Selectmen Do not recommend this Article. 

ARTICLE EIGHT: (Petitioned article) To see if the Town would 
spend the sum of $300. to assist the Lake Tarleton Association and Lake 
Armington Association in their efforts to fund the cost associated with the 
administration of the NH Department of Environmental Services Lake 
Host program. The Lake Host Program is involved throughout the State of 
NH in inspection and intervention activity at public lake landings to detect 
the presence of invasive, aggressive and harmful aquatic weeds on boat 
hulls and trailers that could have a seriously negative effect on water 



10 



quality. The Lake Associations will jointly file a grant request to NH DES 
in the spring of 2008 for funding the costs of hiring part-time summer help 
to conduct the inspections at the two public landings adjacent to Route 
25C (Lake Tarleton Road). As part of the grant process, the State of NH 
encourages funding participation by the towns and municipalities that 
have the participating lakes within their borders. Both Lake Tarleton 
Association and Lake Armington Association will also provide volunteers 
to assist in the inspection activity throughout the summer of 2008. The 
Lake Host Program has been an extremely effective effort by the State of 
NH to maintain the excellent water quality in our lakes. The water quality 
in both Lake Tarleton and Lake Armington is extremely high, and we 
believe that the Lake Host Program activity will assure that we will 
continue to protect a valuable resource that all can access and enjoy. 



ARTICLE NINE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,160 for the Visiting Nurse Alliance of Vermont 
and New Hampshire. 

ARTICLE TEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $878. for the White Mountain Mental Health 
Center. 

ARTICLE ELEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,050 for the support of the Community Action 
Outreach Program. 

ARTICLE TWELVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,300 for the Grafton Senior Citizen Council. 

ARTICLE THIRTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $362 to be paid to the Lower Cohase Communication 
Committee to maintain a web site to promote Haverhill and Piermont, 
New Hampshire and Bradford and Newbury, Vermont. 



11 



ARTICLE FOURTEEN: 

"To see if the Town will vote to hold en adjourned session of the Annuel Town 

Meeting on [insert time and date chosen to allow for holding 

a properly-noticed planning board hearing 5 weeks in advance] for the purpose of 
taking action on a petitioned article calling for the repeal of the Town of Piermont 
Zoning Ordinance. Due to a mistake, the Planning Board did not become aware of 
this property-submitted petition In time to schedule the public hearings required In 
order to include this Question on the March 11 ballot" 

ARTICLE FIFTEEN: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate the sum of $41,351 to install a generator that will produce 
230Amps of power to supply stand-by power for the Town's Emergency 
Shelter which is the Piermont Village School.(state will issue a 50% 
grant). 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE SIXTEEN: To raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 
to go into the Recreational Facility Expendable Trust. (The facility would 
house a tennis court, basketball court, and various court games. 
Committee was given a cost of approximately $75,000.in 2007). 
The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE SEVENTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to 
discontinue the Town of Piermont Bean Brook Bridge Expendable Trust 
Fund that was created in 2000 to accumulate funds for Bean Brook Bridge 
reconstruction project and liquidated by vote of the Selectman after a 
hearing in February, 2007 with the proceeds going to the Town Treasurer 
in October, 2007. NOTE: There has been a zero balance in this account 
since October 16,2007. This is a housekeeping article to satisfy State 
reporting requirements. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE EIGHTTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to 
discontinue the Town of Piermont Sewage District Expendable Trust Fund 
that was created in 1988 to act as a depository for surplus Sewer funds and 
liquidated by a vote of the Selectmen after a hearing in February, 1 999 
with the proceeds going to the Town Treasurer in March, 1999. NOTE: 
There has been a zero balance in this account since March 3, 1999. This is 
a housekeeping article to satisfy State reporting requirements. 



12 



The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE NINETEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be paid into the Town Equipment Capital 
Reserve Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE TWENTY: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be paid into the Town Bridge Capital 
Reserve Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE TWENTY-ONE: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $10,000 to be paid into Town Fire and 
Emergency Vehicles Capital Reserve Fund. The Selectmen 

recommend this Article. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-TWO: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be paid into the Revaluation Capital 
Reserve Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE TWENTY-THREE: To see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate The a sum not to exceed $3,000 to be paid into the 
Town Recycling Center/Transfer Station Expendable Trust, these funds to 
come from anticipated revenue raised from recycling and not to be raised 
from taxation. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 

ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR: To transact any other business that 
may legally come before the Meeting. 



13 



Given under our hand and seal of the Town of Piermont this 
24 day of February 2008. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Robert Lang 



Mark Fagnant 
William Daley 



RETURN 



We hereby attest that the within Warrant is a true copy of the 
Warrant for Annual Town Meeting described therein and further certify 
that we have caused to be posted an attested copy of Warrant at the place 
of the Meeting and a like copy at one other public place in the Town of 
Piermont fourteen days before the day of the Meeting, not counting the 
day of posting or the day of the Meeting. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Robert Lang 
Mark Fagnant 
William Daley 

This Warrant and Return of Warrant have been duly recorded in 
the Office of the Town Clerk of Piermont, New Hampshire, this 24 day of 
February 2008. 

Town Clerk 



14 



SUMMARY OF BUDGET FOR 2008 

FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. SEE POSTED BUDGET 

Town Charges 646,438 

Visiting Nurse Alliance of VT & NH 3,160 

White Mountain Mental Health 878 

Community Action Outreach Program 1 ,050 

Grafton Senior Citizens Council 1 ,300 

CASA 500 

Woodsville 4 th of July Celebration 500 

Lake Host Program 300 

Lower Cohase Regional Chamber of Commerce 362 

Revaluation 12,000 

Tri-County Community Action 1 ,050 

Fire Engine-Payment 38,836 

Paving a Portion of Indian Pond Road 1 73 , 1 00 

Town-Fire & Emergency Vehicles Capital Reserve Fund 10,000 

Revaluation Capital Reserve Fund 5,000 

Upper Valley Ambulance 2,659 

Town Equipment Capital Reserve Fund 5,000 

Town Bridge Capital Reserve Fund 5,000 

Town Recycling Center/Transfer Station Exp.Trust Fund 3,000 

Town Recreation Expendable Trust Fund 5,000 

Emergency Shelter Generator 41,351 

Town Sub-total 956,944 

Estimate of County Tax 1 1 5,285 

TOTAL OF TOWN AND COUNTY 1 ,072,229 



15 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 13, 2007 

TOWN OF PIERMONT 

Polls opened at 10:00 AM in the old church building. There were 
175 voters who voted on Articles One, Two, Three for the Town and Article 
One for the Village School. Polls closed at 6:30 PM. Counted the results 
when preceded to the Village School for the remaining Town Meeting. 

S. Arnold Shields Town Moderator announced he has been ill and as 
appointed and sworn in Joyce Tompkins as Moderator pro-tem for the 
meeting. 

Joyce Tompkins opened the meeting at 7:30 PM followed by the 
Pledge of Alliance. 

All newly elected members for the Town and the school who were 
present were sworn in. (Everyone was present.) 

A motion not to read the entire warrant was made and seconded 
passed by voice vote. 

Results for Articles one, two, and three voted on by all day voting 
were read. 

ARTICLE ONE: (By Official Ballot) To vote by Official Ballot for 
the following Town officers: 

One Selectman term of three years Robert Lang 

One Selectman term of one year William Daley 

A Treasurer term of one year James Lambert 

One Trustee of Trust Funds term of three years Jean Underhill 

Two Library Trustees term of three years Joe Medlicott 

Nancy Sandell 

ARTICLE TWO: (By official ballot) "Are you in favor of the 
adoption of Amendment No.l to the existing Town of Piermont Flood 
Plain Management Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board as 
follows: amend the flood plain ordinance as necessary to comply with the 
requirements of the National Flood Insurance Program?" 

YES 128 NO 44 Passed 



16 



ARTICLE THREE; (By Official Ballot / By Petition) To see if the 
Town will vote to amend the Piermont Zoning Ordinance adopted on 
March 9 th 1971 by adding provisions for a building permit system, with 
inspections performed by a Building Inspector hired by the Selectmen, to 
be financed by fees to be set by the Selectmen. The following question 
shall appear on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of the amendment, as 
proposed by petition, for the Town's Zoning Ordinance, as follows: 
(The amendment will require a building permit prior to any 
construction of new structures or any improvements which increase the 
footprint of existing structures, as well as an inspection system financed 
with a fee to be set by the Selectmen)? The Planning Board opposes 
this amendment." 

If this question is adopted by a majority of those present and voting, the 
following changes will become effective for the Piermont Zoning 
Ordinance (with changed wording shown in bold): 

• Amend Article VI, Section (a) to read as follows: "a. A 
building permit must be obtained before any action is taken to 
constructor erect any new building or structure, or any 
addition to any existing building or structure which 
increases the footprint of such a structure; this requirement 
extends to all structures, residential including mobile homes, 
non-residential, commercial, industrial or agricultural." 

• Amend Article VI Section 1, by adding a new paragraph © as 
follows; "c. All work requiring a building permit shall be 
inspected a minimum of three times, The Selectmen shall 
hire or contract with a part-time Building Inspector, who 
shall be under the supervision of the Zoning Administrator, 
if the two positions are filled by different persons. A 
schedule of building permit fees shall be adopted by the 
Selectmen, sufficient to adequately compensate the Building 
Inspector." 

• Amend Article VIII, Section 1 "Application" by deleting the 
words "a permit or" just before the words "Board of 
Adjustment" so that the entire sentence reads as follows: "After 
the enactment of this Prodinance the regulations specified in 
this Article shall be followed as they may apply, and permitted 
uses shall not require Board of Adjustment approval unless so 
stated." 

YES 39 NO 135 FAILED 



17 



Moderator Tompkins introduced the Board of Selectmen. 

Bob Lang made a statement for the Board about the errors in the 
Town Report. They would like to make a few changes as follows: ON 
PAGE 20 delete one of the 2 fire truck payments of 40,223, need to add in the 
7,777 for dispatching, total should read 620,579. PAGE 22 Article 9 and 10, 
with further research, doesn't need to be a 2/3 vote only a majority required 
(because these articles require no bond). Being money articles the Board of 
Selectmen has to recommend or not an article, they recommend both of these 
articles. PAGE 26 total charges should read 620,579, Town Recreation 
Expandable Trust Fund should read 5,000, total would be 1,004,551 and with 
County Tax reads 1,1 12,551. Motion by Jean Daley to have the corrections 
amends the articles. Seconded by Jim Lambert Voice approved. Proceeded 
with meeting. 

ARTICLE FOUR: To raise and appropriate $620,579 appearing in 
the Town Budget as necessary to defray Town Charges for the 
ensuing year, divided as follows and subject to any adjustment which 
may be voted upon at this Meeting: 

ITEM BUDGETED CHARGE 

Ambulance, Fire and Police Dispatching Services 7,777 

Auditor Expense 8,500 

Cemeteries (see note 1) 1 1,700 

Contingency 2,000 

Election/Registration . 3,000 

Fire Dept. & Fast Squad 32,680 

Fire Truck Payment 40,223 

Highway Subsidy (see note 3) 3 1 ,093 

Highways and Bridges- Summer Maintenance 60,000 

Highways and Bridges- Winter Maintenance 60,000 

Insurance 13,000 

Interest 500 

Legal Expenses 15,000 

Library (see note 5) 42,865 

Memorial Day 500 

Miscellaneous 500 

Officers Expenses 27,000 

Officers Salaries • 52,860 

Planning Board and Zoning Board of Adjustment 10,000 



18 



Police Dept. 38,200 

Public Welfare 25,000 

Recreation and Swimming Pool 7,000 

Solid Waste Disposal (see note 2) 37,90 1 

Street Lights and Blinker 4,500 

Tax Maps 800 

Testing Monitoring Wells 1 2,000 

Town Buildings 25,000 

Upper Valley Ambulance 10,615 

Village Sewer System (Note 4) 40,365 

TOTAL TOWN CHARGES 620,579 

Note 1: Town raises by taxes $6,800; $3500 comes from 
Cemetery Trust Funds, $1400 comes from user fees and surplus in 
Operating Account. 

Note 2: The Town expects to receive $18,000 from the sale of 
bags and other charges to offset this cost. 

Note 3: This amount is received from the State for use by the 
Highway Department. 

Note 4: This entire amount is anticipated to come from user fees, 
with no money raised by taxes. 

Note 5: $9365 from Trust Funds and $33,500 raised with taxes 
MOVED BY: Helga Mueller 
SECONDED BY: Jean Daley 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED No Nays 

ARTICLE FIVE: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the 
sum of $3,000 for the preservation of town records. 
MOVED BY: S Arnold Shields 
SECONDED BY: Gary Danielson 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED No Nays 

ARTICLE SIX: "Shall we modify the elderly exemptions from 
property tax in the Town of Piermont, based on assessed value, for 
qualified taxpayers, to be as follows: 



19 



For a person 65 years of age up to 75 years ($20,000) 
For a person 75 years of age up to 80 years, ($30,000) 
For a person 80 years of age or older ($40,000) 

To qualify, the person must have been a New Hampshire resident 
for at least 3 consecutive years, own the real estate individually or jointly, 
or if the real estate is owned by such person's spouse, they must have been 
married for at least 5 consecutive years. In addition, the taxpayer must 
have a net income of not more than ($25,000) or, if married, a combined 
net income of less than ($32,000); and net assets not in excess of $50,000 
(excluding the value of the person's personal residence and up to 2 acres 
of land)." Under no circumstances shall the amount of the exemption for 
any age category be less than $5000. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article. 

MOVED BY: S Arnold Shields 
SECONDED BY: Robert Elder 

DISCISSION: How do we as a Town verify assesses? The Selectmen 
goes over with the applicant the State forms and their income tax 1040 
forms needed to verify limits to qualify. Why does the Town need to do 
this at all? Our assessments doubled so we feel the exemptions for the 
elderly should kept up the increase. Exemptions are there to help residents 
who are on fixed incomes. The age levels are staying the same just 
increasing income levels with this article. Why can't we help the younger 
people in town that needs help also? This exemption is for the elderly 
only age limits are set by State legistrators. Towns have welfare assistants 
for the younger residents. There is an abatement process also in place for 
anyone who disagrees with his or her assessment for taxes. 
Voice PASSED a few nos 

ARTICLE SEVEN: "Shall we modify the provisions of RSA 
72:2811, The Optional Veterans' Tax Credit whose procedure for 
modification is authorized by RSA72: 27-a, 111 to increase the optional 
veterans' tax credit from its current amount of $100 to $500 "the 
maximum currently allowed by law", such amount to be subtracted each 
year from the property tax on the veteran's residential property." 
The Selectmen recommend this Article 



20 



MOVED BY: Fred Shipman 

SECONDED BY: John Metcalf 

DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED No Nays 

ARTICLE EIGHT: To see if the town will vote to raise the sun of 
$12,000 to fund the first year of a five- year revaluation of the Town. 
(Note: the contract is a rolling revaluation service to be completed on or 
before October 1, 201 1. Doing % of the Town annually for a total cost of 
$12,000, each year in 2007,2008,2009,2010, 2011 for a statistical update 
at the end in 201 1 to update all values, hold hearings, defense of values.) 

MOVED BY: Sam Rounds 
SECONDED BY: Jean Daley 

DISCISSION: How is five years considered quarterly? The Town will be 
revalued each year in one quarter of the town. In the fifth year they will 
activate the precise four years valuation with adjustments for the currant 
market values. By keeping up with assessments we're hoping we will not 
be forced to have a complete revaluation as we did this last year. The State 
was willing to work with us last year with all our troubles. They are very 
willing to help the Town with anything we need as long as we are trying. 
So the board is saying we will not see a change in values for the next four 
years except for new construction and in fifth year is when assessment will 
changes? Yes, our C.O.D. should stay within 10% of 100% market 
assessed value which is where the State what's it to be. 
Voice PASSED afewNos 

ARTICLE NINE: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate 
the sum of $124,350 to reconstruct approximately 1000 linear feet of 
Indian Pond Road. (2/3 Ballot vote required.) 

MOVED BY: Chris Davidson 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 

DISCISSION: What 1000 feet is this going to be? Informally hoping for 
Vi way up hill to Dale Fields. If this money is not in he summer, winter or 
subsidy budgets why doesn't this go out to bid? If put out to bid was told 
it would cost closer to $250,000, will need to have engineered plans. It 
was again stated that a majority is all this needs not a ballot vote. Why 
isn't this in Road Agents budget? Can Chris break this cost down? (See 



21 



attachment A). Bill Hamilton speaking for this article stated he has been 
in town for 35 years and nothing has been done on Indian Pond Road. He 
urges the town do fix it right. If this article were to pass it would be 
$30,000 not the $124,000? Correct. Chris has a 10-year plan for all town 
roads. What does this article have as a 2" Base and 1 'Wear for road? (See 
attachment B). It was brought up that neither Lily Pond nor Church Street 
has a wear coat why start new project. Shouldn't we finish these old jobs 
first before starting new! Church Street does have a wear coat from Route 
10 to Fred Shipman's Garage but Lily Pond Road doesn't. Lily Pond 
Road will be done this year out of the subsidy account. Article called 
Voice PASSED few Nos 

ARTICLE TEN: To raise and appropriate the sum of $172,400 to 
remove the existing steel beam girder and wood planking (now 14' wide x 
30' long single span bridge) crossing Bean Brook on Bean Brook Road 
with a concrete beam and deck for a 21' wide x 36' long span bridge. (To 
date we have $145,492.88 in Bean Brook Bridge Expandable Trust Fund.) 
MOVED BY: Helga Mueller 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 

DISCISSION: Jean Daley asks to amend article to read the balance of the 
Fund be removed from Expandable Trust. Seconded by Helga Mueller. 
Voice PASSED on amendment. S.Arnold Shields moves article as 
amended. Seconded by Bill Hamilton. Is this a complete cost for the 
bridge- Yes. (See attached list C from Chris) ' Is this a guaranteed cost or 
are you coming back for more money? Could but don't see any 
unforeseen problems and has built in for cost inflation. Frank Rodimon 
asks for clarification on article- Road Agent is asking for 27,000 dollars 
(difference from expandable fund) along with all the Bean Brook Bridge 
Expandable Trust. That is correct the fund is gaining interest every day 
until we withdraw funds so it could be less because of this. 
Voice PASSED No Nays 

ARTICLE ELEVEN: To raise and appropriate the sum of $12,200 
to purchase an applicator and storage tank for a Liquid Dust Suppression 
System. 

MOVED BY: Chris Davidson 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 



22 



DISCISSION: Is this for calcium chloride? We would like to try a new 
product -magnesium (lasts for 3 months at a time) later on use calcium 
chloride (use ever month). Katy Blaine asks if this is toxic because she 
lives with children down from the town garage? It's in a sealed storage 
3,000 tanks and it passed CA EPA standards and they are the toughest. It 
doesn't need special care. It's non-toxic and non- flammable. George 
Smith expressed a concern that the Road Agent was to have his own 
equipment to be road agent. He was under the assumption this was so the 
town wouldn't own equipment except for the grader? Yes this is true but 
in pass the town has owned smaller items. Does it go in back of pickup? 
It can be mounted in any 6 to 10 wheeled dump trucks. Do we need this 
on our dirt roads $12,000 seems like a lot of money? Another storage tank 
we don't need! The town has 1 1.2 two lane dirt roads out of 19 miles for 
the calcium chloride application not only does it slow down dust but the 
dust causes 5% of road base to decrease. Do we really need this at all? 
CALLED the article. 

Show of hands Yes 71 No 43 CALL for recount 
Division of House Yes 44 No 48 CALL for ballot vote 

Recessed for voting. Audience went through Checklist for a ballot 

vote. 
Yes 39 No 51 article FAILED 

ARTICLE TWELVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500. For the benefit of CASA (Court Appointed 
Special Advocates of New Hampshire). 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Ellen Putnam 

DISCISSION: This should be done indivially not as a town article. 
Voice PASSED a few No 

ARTICLE THIRTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,160 for the Visiting Nurse Alliance of Vermont 
and New Hampshire. 
MOVED BY: Ellen Putnam 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 



23 



ARTICLE FOURTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $600 for the White Mountain Mental Health 
Center. 

MOVED BY: Gary Danielson 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE FIVETEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $950 for the support of the Community Action 
Outreach Program. 
MOVED BY: Fred Shipman 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE SIXTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,450 for the Grafton Senior Citizen Council. 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Barbara Fitzpatrick 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE SEVENTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate $362 to be paid to the Lower Cohase Communication 
Committee to maintain a web site to promote Haverhill and Piermont, 
New Hampshire and Bradford and Newbury, Vermont. 
MOVED BY: Helga Mueller 
SECONDED BY: Fred Shipman 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED afewNos 

ARTICLE EIGHTTEEN: (By petition) "To see if the Town will 
vote to authorize the selectmen to deposit 1 00% of the revenue collected 
from the Land Use Change Tax into the Town's Conservation Fund. 
Increasing to 100% the percentage of the Land Use Change Tax going to 
the Conservation Fund will enable the Conservation Commission to be 
more responsive in protecting Piermont' s farms and woodlands." 

The Selectmen does not recommend this Article. 
MOVED BY: Helga Mueller 
SECONDED BY: Sam Rounds 



24 



DISCISSION: Bill Morris, speaking for the conservation committee, 
explained that they now get 10% of currant use release. What will be done 
with this money? Hopefully to buy land, but now it will go into an account 
to raise enough funds to buy land so it won't be subdivided. Fred Shipman 
asks what kind of fund is this money in and how is it spent? Checking 
account what is the five-year projection on currant use release money? 
We have a few subdivisions in the works and it could get to be a large 
amount but who really knows. Currant Use Release is based on 10% of 
market value of land coming out of currant use. Helga Mueller, chairman 
of the conservation committee, states they are receiving the lowest 
percentage around the area. Chris Davidson remarked that at a meeting he 
was at recently with the Land Trust of New Hampshire they remarked that 
Piermont has the most land conserved in the State. This should be enough. 
Does committee need a vote of town to spend this money? Helga reads 
article that first established the conservation committee that states they 
have to come before the town to spend any money at all. George Smith, in 
his opinion, the town needs to support the committee but not with this 
article. It should be done by a line item in budget not by currant use 
release. When White Mountain National Forrest come off the tax rolls the 
tax on that parcel went from $30,000 to $3,000 - do we need more off tax 
rolls? Select board stated that there isn't much coming out of currant use 
once it goes in. They feel the Town needs this revenue to help keep taxes 
down and for services a development would present for the Town. What 
amount is in this account now? Neither (Bill or Helga) had any idea what 
is in the account. The Select board pointed out that there is a lot of land in 
conservation in Town today. Fred Shipman makes motions to amend 
article to read 50% of currant use release fees and to have conservation 
committee have a small operating fund also they have to come before the 
town to spend anything else. Abigale Underhill seconded. Bill Morris is 
against this amendment - what if the committee needs a fast deposit for a 
quick buy? The committee can call a special meeting of the town to 
discuses with town's people the buy. What is operating expenses for the 
committee? David Ritchie, committee treasurer, states about $150. per 
year. Katherine Johnson remarked that the committee is a valuable asset 
to the town and we should have a respectable budget for their use. Fred 
Shipman and Abigale Underhill withdrew motion for the amendment. 
Selectman pointed out we could loose thousands of dollars over 10 to 15 
years in taxes if this article passes. Don Mitchell pointed out the fact that 



25 



with taxpayers' money used to buy this land it also takes it off the tax 
rolls. In essence we would be paying twice for the same land. Chris 
Davidson CALLED Article, John Metcalf seconded. Voice passed to 
move article - Show of Hands Yes 31 No 43 
Ballot FAILED 

ARTICLE NINETEEN: (By request of the Recreational 
Committee) To raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 to set up a 
Recreational Facility Expandable Trust. The facility would house a tennis 
court, basketball court, and various court games. Committee was given a 
cost of approximately $75,000. 
MOVED BY: Chris Davidson 
SECONDED BY: Tom Elliott 

DISCISSION: Where would this go? Not sure but maybe on the property 
adjacent to the old dump site. 

Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE TWENTY: To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $20,000 to be paid into the Bean Brook Bridge 
Expendable Trust Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 
PASSED OVER (article 10 passed) 

ARTICLE TWENTY-ONE: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be paid into the Town Equipment 
Capital Reserve Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Bill Cahill 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE TWENTY-TWO: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be paid into the Town Bridge Capital 
Reserve Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Chris Davidson 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 



26 



ARTICLE TWENTY-THREE: To see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $ 1 0,000 to be paid into Town Fire and 
Emergency Vehicles Capital Reserve Fund. The Selectmen 

recommend this Article. 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Sam Rounds 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be paid into the Revaluation Capital 
Reserve Fund. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Abigale Underhill 

DISCISSION: By passing article 8 do we need this article? Ifwehaveto 
do a revaluation for the State this would help out. After 4 years we need 
not but in any more money we will be on the revaluation cycle. 

Voice PASSED afewNos 

ARTICLE TWENTY-FIVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum not to exceed $3,000 to be paid into the Town 
Recycling Center/Transfer Station Expendable Trust, these funds to come 
from anticipated revenue raised from recycling and not to be raised from 
taxation. 

The Selectmen recommend this Article 
MOVED BY: Tom Elliott 
SECONDED BY: Roy Belyea 
DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE TWENTY-SIX: (By petition) To see if the town will 
go on record in support of effective actions by the President and the 
Congress to address the issue of climate change which is increasingly 
harmful to the environment and economy of New Hampshire and to the 
future well being of the people of Piermont. These actions include: 

1. Establishment of a national program requiring reductions of 
U.S. greenhouse gas emissions while protecting the U.S. 
economy. 



27 



2. Creation of a major national research initiative to foster rapid 
development of sustainable energy technologies thereby 
stimulating new jobs and investment. 

MOVED BY: Helga Mueller 

SECONDED BY: Steve Rounds 

DISCISSION: None Voice PASSED 

ARTICLE TWENTY-SEVEN: To transact any other business that 
may legally come before the Meeting. 

Alex Medlicott would like to recognize Captain Tom Elliott and 
Nancy Cole for they are leaving the Fast Squad. Standing ovations was 
given. 

George Smith would like to thank Bob Lang for stepping in after 
he said he would not run and ran for another three-year term after no one 
filed. 

The Piermont Puddle (swim hole) wasn't opened in 2006- why? 
New regulations mean new equipment plus needs some repair work. Does 
the Town want the Puddle kept open? There was a show of hands to keep 
it open. Recreation Committee Chairman stated they already have, as a 
line item, $1,500 for testing and start up of the puddle in 2007. 

Gary Danielson thanks Joyce Tompkins for standing in when 
Moderator Shields got ill on such short notice. 

Katherine Johnson would like to thank Emily Shipman for her 
starting up the Market Place in town at old store lot. The town really does 
need it and everyone enjoys the vendors' products. 

Robert Ritchie stood up for Bill Deals moment of silence for those 
who have passed away. 

S.Arnold Shields moved to adjourn 
Abigale Underhill seconded 
Voice Passed Adjourned at 9:50. 



Selectmen, Chairman 
Robert Lang 

Submitted by Town Clerk, 

Linda Lambert 



28 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 



Ambulance Service 




10,635.00 


Auditors Expenses 




8,500 


CASA 


Article 12 





Cemeteries 




6,800 


Community Action Outreach 


Article 15 


950 


Dispatch Service 




8,403.48 


"Dump" Wells Monitoring 




11,489 


Fire Truck Payment 




54,029.98 


Grafton Senior Citizen Council 


Article 16 


1,450 


Hwy Summer 




60,647.81 


Hwy Winter 




81,821.9 


Hwy Subsidy 




31,093.00 


Indian Pond Road 


Article 9 


124,350 


Bean Brook Bridge 


Article 10 


-46,152.41 


Library 




33,500 


Lower Cohase 


Article 17 


362 


Memorial Day 




412 


Preservation of Town Records 


(see Town Clerk Report) 





Revaluation 


Article 8 


12,000 


Street Lights/ Brinkers 




5,103.90 


Trust Funds 


Articles19-25 


53,000 


Visiting Nurse All. VT/NH 


Article 13 


3,160 


Welfare 




7,774.32 


White Mt Mental Health 


Article 14 


600 



29 



ITEM 



BUDGETED ACTUALLY PROPOSED 
2007 SPENT 2008 



Assessors Pickups (changes) 




4,970.75 


2,500 


Auditor Expenses 


8,500 


8,500 


9,500 


Cemeteries (note 2) 


11,700 


6,800 


1 1 ,200 


Conservation Committee 




118 


2,000 


Contingency 


2,000 





2,000 


Dispatch Services 


7,777 


8,403.48 


8,611 


Elections 


3,000 


1,825.61 


5,000 


Fire Dept/Fast Squad 


32,680 


32,862.69 


38,480 


Fire Truck Payment 


40,223 


40,451 


38,836 


Highways/Bridges-Summer 


60,000 


60,647.81 


62,800 


Highways/Bridges-Winter 


60,000 


81,821.9 


65,000 


Hwy Subsidy (note 3) 


31,093 


31,093 


32,376 


Insurance 


13,000 


9,098.86 


9,500 


Interest 


500 


6,828.96 


5,000 


Legal Expenses 


15,000 


6,354.48 


10,000 


Library (note 5) 


42,865 


33,500 


42,865 


Memorial Day 


500 


412 


1,500 


Misc. 


500 


531 


500 


Officers Expenses 


27,000 


30,017 


25,000 


Officers Salaries 


52,860 


•44,376.51 


54,000 


Planning BD/Zoning Bd Expenses 


10,000 


12,831.99 


10,000 


Police Dept 


38,200 


37,237.7 


46,684 


Public Welfare 


25,000 


7,774.32 


15,000 


Recreation and Swimming Prog 


7,000 


6,774.84 


7,000 


Revaluation Payment 




12,000 


12,000 


Shelving for Safe 






2,000 


Solid Waste Disposal (note 4) 


37,901 


32,874.01 


39,908 


Street Lights/Blinkers 


4,500 


5,103 


. 5,500 


Tax Maps 


800 





800 


Test-Monitoring Wells (recycling) 


12,000 


11,489 


11,000 


Town Buildings 


25,000 


22,444.73 


25,000 


Upper Valley Ambulance 


10,615 


10,635 


10,635 


Village Sewer System (note 1) 


40,365 


37,743.09 


34,243 




620579 


605,520.73 


646,438 TOTAL 



30 



2007 SUMMARY OF INVENTORY OF VALUATION 

Land 

Current Use (at C.U. values) 1,532,887 

Conservation Restriction 281,800 

Residential 32,205,019 

Commercial/Industrial 2,006,750 

Buildings 

Residential 49,612,630 

Manufactured Housing 768,250 

Commercial/Industrial 4,590,740 

Public Utilities 

Electric (includes Phone-no land) 846,405 

Valuation Before Exemptions 9 1 ,844,48 1 

Elderly Exemptions 532,780 

Solar Exemptions 1,950 

Blind Exemption 
Total Exemptions 534,730 

Net Valuation on Which Tax Rate is computed 9 1 ,309,75 1 

Utilities 

Central Vermont Public Service 1 ,042 

New England Power Co. 58,035 

New Hampshire Electric Coop. 485,802 

Evans Evans and Evans 1 2 1 ,797 

Public Service of NH 78,871 

Total 745,547 



31 



DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

Municipal Servicas Division 
2007 Tax Rate Calculation 



TOWN/CITY: PIERMONT 



Gross Appropriations 


972,351 


less Revenues 


437.520 


Less Shares Revenues 


2,371 


Acs: Overlay 


2,957 


Wa' Service Credits 


24,200 



"h/o~? 



Net^owr Appropnaoon 



Special Adjustment 



559,617 



I Approved Town/Oty Tax Effort 



SCHOOL PORTION 



Net Local Scr-oot Budget (Gross Apprpp. - Revenue) 



Regional School Apporfrcrment 



Less: Adequate Education Grant 



1,575,689 



(430,865) 



State E ejcabon Taxes 



Approves School(s) Tax Effort 



(203,798) 



STATE EDUCATION TAXES 



COUNTY PORTION 



Due to County 



116,317 



iLess: Shared Revenues 



shorn 



559,617 | TOWN RATE 
6.13 



LOCAL 



EcuaNzec Valuabon(no ut Irbes) x 


S2.24 




90,981,478 | 




203,798 


Divide by Local Assessed Vak.at or (no ublrttes) 




90,463,346 | 




Excess State Education Taxes to be Remitted to State 




Pay to State — ► 


o 





941.C26 1 SCHOOL RATE 
10.31 



STATE 



2.25 



Approved County Tax Effort 


115,285 


COUNTY RATE 
1.26 










TOTAL RATE 
19.95 


Total Property Taxes Assessed 


1,819,726 


Less: War Service Credits 


(24,200) 




Add: Vt lage D strict Commitments) 







Total Property Tax Coromttmant 


1,795,526 





PROOF OF RATE 



Net Assessed Vaiuabon 


Tax Rate 


Assessment 


State Educat or. Tax :»*■««) 


90,463,346 


2.75 


202,799 


All Other Taxes 


91,309,751 


17.70 


1,615.928 








1,819,726 



TRC# 



TRC# 



32 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 

Bldgs. -Selectmen-Library, FireDept.Hwy. Garage 259,540 

Furniture & Equipment 20,000 

Land- Selectmen-Library, Fire Dept.,Hwy. Garage 284,250 

Equipment-Fire Department 430,000 

Old Church, Lands and Buildings 355,210 

Bean Brook Road Land 56,830 

Highway Equipment 94,000 

Parks, Commons and Playgrounds 36,810 

Schools, Lands and Buildings 96 1 ,8 1 

Cemeteries 37,740 

Piermont Sewage District Land 37,740 

Fire Ponds 40,950 

Connecticut River Lot (School Lot) 82,000 

Sarah Moore Lot 40,000 

Open Space Lot (Glebe Lot) 1 1 1 ,280 

Equipment-Police 30,000 

TOTAL 2,878,160 



33 



PLODZIK & SANDERSON 

Professional Association /Accountants & Auditors 

November 26, 2007 RECEDED MOV 28 2G07 

JVembeis of the Board of Selectmen 

Town of Piermont 
P.O. Box 67 
Piermont, NH 03779 

Dear Members of the Board: 

As we have tried to keep you aware through letters throughout the past year, auditing 

standards have been changing drastically. The latest set to affect our audit procedures 
are the risk assessment standards (AICP'A Statements on Auditing Standards Nos. 104 - 
111). These standards require that we as auditors, obtain a more in-depth understanding 
of each client and its internal controls to identify the risk of material misstatement from 
error or fraud, and what the client does to mitigate the risks. They also require a much 
more rigorous assessment of the risks of how and where the financial statements could be 
materially misstated, and an improved linkage between the assessed risks and the nature, 
timing and extent of audit procedures performed in response to those risks. 
We have sent some of our directors and senior staff people to various training programs 
to ascertain the type of procedures that we must now follow in all of our audit 
engagements. It appears that the time to complete an audit will increase significantly, in 
some cases by as much as 50%. 

Because of this projected increase in time and the finite number of audit staff that we 
have (coupled with the retirement this year of one of our directors), we have come to the 
unfortunate conclusion that we are going to have to discontinue services with some of our 
clients. This decision was not reached lightly as we have had longstanding engagements 
with many of our clients. In determining which clients to terminate, we have considered 
many factors, including time of year, distance, difficulty or ease of completion, number 
of staff required, hours to complete, etc. 

We therefore, wish to let you know that we will not be able to perform your audit for the 
year ended December 31, 2007. We are sorry that we have not given you more notice, but 
we have had to meet several times in order to make these decisions. We would like to 
take this opportunity to wish you the best. We will be available to provide copies of 
work papers to your new auditor to assist in the transition. 

We are still awaiting the certification in order to finalize your audit report for 2006. As 
soon as we receive that certification, we will send you the management representation 
letter to be signed, and will let you know if there are any other items required at that time. 

* 

Yours truly, 

Sheryl A. Pratt, CPA Director 

34 



SELECTMENS REPORT FOR 2007 

The year 2007 was a challenging year for Town Officials. We saw 
the Camp Walt Whitman Case returned by the New Hampshire Superior 
Court back to the Zoning Board. The Zoning Board must try to reach an 
agreement with Camp Walt Whitman on the limits of the Camp size. 
Amperes plus support staff) 

I know many people were surprised when they got their tax bill. 
For the most part the same people who attended the Town Meeting do not 
go to the School Meeting. The actions of both groups on warrant articles 
pushed the tax rate up by 23 Vi%. 

The most discouraging episodes was the letter we received on 
November 28,2007 from our auditors: Plodzik and Sanderson, (see page). 
Because of the timing of the letter were unable to have your audit done in 
January as we always have had done. We just recently found an auditor 
who will be able to do the audit in the spring of 2008. 

Finally in December we had" the changing of the guard" in the Police 
Department; Mr. Robert Garvin replaced Mr. Stephen Medeiros. The 
Board of Selectmen made Mr. Garvin, Police Chief. 

I THANK Bill Daley and Mark Fagnant for their efforts in Town 
offices for the year 2007. 
Respectfully submitted 
Robert Lang Chairman of the Board 



35 



TOWN CLERKS REPORT 2007 
SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 

Motor Vehicle Registrations ( 1 ,2 1 0) 1 1 9,69 1 .47 

Motor Vehicle Titles (110) 220 

Dog Licenses,Fines ( 1 86) 1,514 

State sticker fees 2,732.50 

Other (Fees, Permits, Zoning Books, etc.) 290 

124,447.97 

REMINDER*** ALL DOGS OVER 4 MONTHS OLD MUST BE LICENSED. 

2008 TAGS ARE IN BUT YOU NEED PROOF OF RABIES TO OBTAIN LICENSE 

You noticed that last year Article 5, 1 asked the town for $3,000to continue the 
preservation of Town records. 

We received a grant from the Conservation Plates (Moose Plates) from the State 
that covered this and much more. We first received an appraisal of what we need from 
Dartmouth Collage. From this workup we got 2 sets of shelves, some acid free boxes to 
store your already preserved books, a new dehumidifier, thermo system to keep an eye on 
conditions in safe from outside safe, plus a few smaller items to help preserve our 
records. All vital record books are know done and hopefully we can start on other town 
records that don't qualify here (minutes, deeds, etc). 

We had $10,000 to spend (only on Vital Records). We didn't spend all of this 
amount but we did get everything the grant would allow *( we spent $5,800). 

I personally would like to thank all MOOSE PLATE owners for contributing to 
this fund. The extra you pay for your plates goes into this fund and made available to 
Towns. 



36 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
Fiscal Year Ending December 31,2007 



Uncollected taxes -Beg of Year 

Property Taxes 

Resident Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Utility 
Revenues Committed -This Year 

Property Taxes 

Resident Taxes 

Land Use Change 

Yield Taxes 

Excavation Taxes 

Utilities 
Interest Collected on Delinquent Taxes 
Penalties Collected 



1,797,247.68 
4,250.00 
3,610.00 
7,328.93 
43.00 
27,130.00 
1,058.27 
2,684.36 



335,508.09 
1,000.00 
5,605.53 
3,391.09 

-400.66 



7,415.68 
1,638.50 



TOTAL DEBITS 


1,843,352.24 


354,158.23 


CREDITS 






Remitted to Treasurer During Fiscal Year: 


This Year 


Prior Years 


Property Taxes 


1,548,533.53 


289,264.58 


Resident Taxes 


3,080.00 


600.00 


Land Use Change 


3,610.00 




Yield Taxes 


7,328.93 


5,605.53 


Excavation Taxes 


43.00 




Utilities 


24,165.25 


3,391.09 


Interest 


1,058.27 


4,018.90 


Penalties 


1,867.39 


1,400.53 


Conversion to LIEN 




44,491.36 


Abatements Made: 






Resident Taxes 


240.00 


300.00 


Property Taxes 


1,708.13 


5,026.24 


Uncollected Rev - Year End 






Property Taxes 


247,822.99 




Resident Taxes 


930.00 


60.00 


Utilities 


2,964.75 





TOTAL CREDITS 



1,843,352.24 354,158.23 



37 



TAX SALE/LIEN ON ACCOUNT OF LEVIES 

Unredeemed Taxes-Bal at Beg of Fiscal Year 30,048.93 

Liens Sold or Executed During Fiscal Year 44,559.36 

Interest Collected After Execution 6,551.16 

TOTAL DEBITS 81,1 59.45 

CREDITS 

Remittance to Treasurer: 35,661.14 

Abatements 908.26 

Interest Collected 6,458.35 

Unredeemed Taxes on Initial Lien 38,131.70 

TOTAL CREDITS 81,159.45 

Linda Lambert, Tax Collector 



38 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR 2007 

TAX CURRENT YEAR 

PROPERTY 1,540,801 77 

RESIDENT 3,08000 

YIELD 10,266.65 

GRAVEL TAX 43.00 

INTEREST & PENALTIES 12,871.32 

TAXES PRIOR YEARS 

PROPERTY 335,307.25 

RESIDENT 650.00 

YIELD 5,605.54 

CURRENT USE 3,610.00 

REDEMPTIONS 31,559.77 

REDEMPTIONS INTEREST 6,276.35 

STATE & FEDERAL 

REVENUE DISTRIBUTION 7,854.00 

BLOCK GRANT 31 ,093 42 

FORESTY 3,229.00 

CAPITAL RESERVE INCOME 149,786.39 

ROOM & MEALS 30,811.79 

OTHER SOURCES 

RENT OF TOWN PROPERTY 750.00 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TITLES 1 19,91 1 .47 

ELDERLY TAX LIEN 3,941 .74 

MA FEES 2,732.50 

DOG LICENSES & FINES 1 ,597.50 

PAY TO THROW 1 8,720.20 

RECYCLING 3,346.96 

TRUST FUND 18,456.51 

PLANNING BOARD FEES 61 3.69 

ZONING 135.00 

BUILDING PERMITS 160.00 

INTEREST INCOME 3,494.04 

ELECTRIC (LIBRARY) 61 1 .55 

SALE OF TOWN PROPERTY 500.00 

INSURANCE REBATE 67.00 

INVESTMENT RECEIVED FROM MSB 1 00,000 00 

DONATIONS 305.00 

RECREATION INCOME 145 00 

OTHER 519.05 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 2,448,853 46 

BEGINNING BALANCE 299,627.56 

TOTAL 2,748,481.02 

LESS EXPENDITURES 2,420,083.16 

BALANCE 12-31-06 328,397.86 



39 



STATEMENT OF ORDERS DRAWN BY SELECTMEN 
ON TREASURER 



Town Officers Salaries 

Robert Lang 
Mark Fagnant 
William Daley 
Linda Lambert 
Linda Lambert 
Linda Lambert 
Katy Blaine 
James Lambert 
Jean Underhill 
Elizabeth Bayne 
Wayne Godfrey 
Wayne Godfrey 
Terry Robie 
Fred Shipman 



Selectman 


2,500 


Selectman 


2,000 


Selectman 


2,000 


Town Clerk 


13,957.5 


Tax Collector 


7,010 


Administrative Asst. 


3,362.5 


Deputy Town Clerk 


3,549 


Treasurer 


4,725 


Bookkeeper 


926.25 


Bookkeeper 


1,717 


Animal Control Officer 


955 


Emergency Mangement 


174.26 


Zoning Administrator 


1,000 


Trust Fund Trustee 


500 


TOTAL 





44,376.51 



Town Officers' Expenses 

Animal Control Expenses 

Bank Charges 

Branham Publishing 

Charter / Electric 

Commerford, Nieder Perkins 

Conferences 

FICA 

Fletcher Printing 

Giddings Mfg. 

Grafton County 

Elizabeth Bayne 

IDS 

Lexis Nexis Matthew Bender 

Linda Lambert 

NEBS 

New England Micrographics 

NH Assoc, of Town Clerks 

NH Dept. of Agriculture 

NH Tax Collectors Assoc. 

NHMA 

Philatelic Fulfillment Center 

Plymouth Village Water & Sewer 

Postmaster 

Ross Business Center 



Fees 
Books 

Internet/Electric 
Assessing- pickups 
All Officers 

Town Report 

Signs 

Filing Fees 

Reimburstments 

Dog tags 

Updates for law books 

Remibustments 

Checks 

Microfilm storage 

Dues 

Dog Licenses 

Dues 

Dues 

Stamped Envelopes 

Annual Fee 

Postage & box rents . 

Copier repair 



315 

20 

718.69 

611.55 

6,270.75 

987.23 

3,445.85 

2,875 

152.1 

280.32 

361.73 

71.74 

344.43 

655.46 

355.98 

75 

60 

489.5 

25 

20 

695.25 

100 

1,899 

139.95 



40 



Staples 


Supplies 


1,608.22 


Press 


Notices 


736.31 


Verizon 


Phone 


348.46 


Legal Expenses 




6,354.48 
TOTAL 30,017 


Election and Registration 






Ace Blueprint Services 




54.7 


Everett Jesseman 




90 


Geraldine Wood 




81 


Lou Hobbs 




90 


Peggy Fullerton 




208 


Linda Lambert 




776.15 


Ellen Divan 




90 


Russell Woodard 




90 


Vea Jenks 




90 


Joyce Tompkins 




108 


Four Corners Store 




97.76 


Tuck Press 




50 
TOTAL 1,825.61 


Town Buildings 






CVEC/PSNH 


Electricity 


1,710.86 


Perry's Oil 


Old Church Bldg. 


3.053.99 


Perry's Oil 


Repairs 


352.71 


John Metcalf 


Labor- Yard Maintenance 


1,409 


K&R Portable Toilets 


Town Garage 


1,125 


Bob Lang 


Misc Supplies 


208.99 


FICA 




118.43 


Godfrey Enterprises 


Cleaning 


469.97 


Verizon 


Old Church Bldg. 


348.46 


Patten's Propane 


Town Office Heat 


952.62 


Terry Robie 


Repairs/Railing/Police Station 


8,750 


Piermont Sewer 


Sewer. 


1,945 


Misc Exspenses 




1,565.84 


Yard Supplies 


Maintenance 


433.86 
TOTAL 22,444.73 


Police Department 






Robert Garvin 


Labor & Expenses 


448 


Steve Medeiros 


Labor & Expenses 


15,249 


Greg Collins 


Labor & Expenses 


2,646.5 


Camden Elliott 


Labor & Expenses 


1,963 


Verizon & Charter 


Telephone & Internet 


1,879.52 


Training 




1,628 


Gasoline 




1,150.21 



41 



Gall's Inc. 

NHDept. of Safety 

Ccorey's Sport Shop 

Pikcomm Communications 

Mileage 

Police Cruiser 

Quartermaster 

Fica Expense 

Staples 

Repairs & Maintenance 

Misc 



Planning and Zoning Boards 

Journal Opionion 

Helga Mueller 

Register of Deeds 

Gardner Fulton & Waugh 

UVLSRPC 

Postmaster 

Gardener Fulton & Waugh 

Misc 



Fire Department 

Diesel Fuel 

Orford Service Center 

Charter & Verison 

PSNH 

Station House Supply Inc 

Perry's Oil Service 

Training 

Four Corners Store 

Misc 

Air Compresser 

Oakes Bros. Inc. 

Truck Supplies/ Repairs 

Mileage 

Publis Safety 

Motorola 

Twin State Mutual Aid 

UVRESAInc 

Fire Bam 

Visa 



Supplies 


1,320.55 


Certification & books 


635.57 


Equipment 


2,281.81 


Install Radios 


111.75 




94.09 




836.95 


Equipment/ Uniforms 


2,842.04 




1,482.82 


Computer & Supplies 


2,116.94 




280.06 




270.89 




TOTAL 37,237.7 


Notices 


475.95 


Secretary/Expenses 


750 


Recording 


63.39 


ZBA- Camp Walt Whitman 


5,337.03 


Regulations -Dues 


812 


Box Rent Postage 


272.6 


ZBA -Faustini 


4,957.27 


Legal 


163.75 




TOTAL 12,831.99 




474.41 


Batteries 


351.74 


Internet & Telephone 


761.96 


Electricity 


2,411.25 


Supplies 


787.5 


Fuel Oil 


3,913.77 




4,440 


Gasoline 


293.64 




349.42 




250 


Materials 


187.38 




2,304.02 




307.39 


Traffic Cones 


669.15 


Radio/Pager 


527.5 


Dues 


200 


Dues 


50 


Equipment 


3789.98 


Parts and Signs 


746.95 



42 



FICA 

Dred Warehouse 

Roy Belyea 
Wayne Godfrey 
Aaron Rich 
Austin Hogan 
Bruce Henry 
Cory Austin 
Cory Collins 
Dana Hartley 
Glen Putnam 
Greg Collins 
James A Mauchly 
JeffHuntington 
Jim Putnam 
Keith Brick 
Matthew Prince 
Michelle Metcalf 
Richard Dion 
Roy Belyea 
Steven Daly 
Wayne Godfrey 





653.13 


Forestry 


868.87 


Fire Warden 


48.8 


Deputy Warden 


41.68 


Firemen 


390.94 


Firemen 


478.42 


Firemen 


654.41 


Firemen 


294.01 


Firemen 


113.18 


Firemen 


414.93 


Firemen 


565.55 


Firemen 


438.44 


Firemen 


460.73 


Firemen 


552.44 


Firemen 


206.71 


Firemen /Chief 


1,516.88 


Firemen 


471.31 


Firemen 


571.29 


Firemen 


540.9 


Firemen 


341.68 


Firemen 


378.25 


Firemen 


44.08 


1 SUBTOTAL 32.862.69 



Fast Squad 

Speare Memorial Hospital 

Defibulator / Pads 

Training 

John Monaghan 

Upper Valley Ambulance 

Misc 



Pharmacy 



Supplies 

Books 

Supplies 



SUBTOTAL 



427.24 

1192.86 

195 

319.9 

60 

36 

2231 



TOTAL 35,093.69 



Insurance 








Local Government Center 


Liability 




8,853.84 


Acadia Ins. 


Indian Pond Rd 




312 






TOTAL 


9,165.84 


Solid Waste Disposal 








Floyd Marsh 


Trucking Recyclables 


680. 




PSNH 


Electricity 


203.35 




White River Paper 


Plastic Bags/Labels 


4,636.97 





43 



Northeast Resource Recovery 


Paper removal 


50. 


Linda Godfrey 


Labeling bags 


234.08 


C M Davidson 


Glass bunker 


70 


NH State Treasurer 


Recertifications 


100 


Propane Heater 


New Equipment 


299.24 


Haulers 


Trucking Recyclables 


988.41 


Misc. 


Supplies 


424.84 


Don's Auto 


Tire disposal 


460. 


John Metcalf 


Labor 


2368.40 


John Metcalf 


Mileage 


55.29 


Normandeau Trucking 


Waste Disposal 


13,808.45 


North Country Council 


Hazardous Waste 


316.43 


Rick Stygles 


Labor 


2,006.59 


Abby Metcalf 


Labor 


376.43 


Wayne Godfrey 


Labor 


4,622.95 


Randy Dunbar 


Labor 


294.94 


Perry's Oil 


Propane 


22.43 


FICA 




782.46 


Training 




72.75 




SUBTOTAL 


32,874.01 


Pay as you throw Income 




-18,720.20 


Recycling Fees & Sales 




-3,346.96 
TOTAL 10,806.85 


Recreation Field & Swimming 






Lake Testing 




461 


Swim Program 




1,400 


Baseball 




1,072.84 


Track 




267 


Supplies 


Expenses 


2,352 


Trophies-Soccer 




682 


Little League Dues 




540 



TOTAL 



6,774.84 



School District 
County Tax 



1,199,137 
116,317 



Total 



1,496,011. 



44 



INDIAN POND ROAD RECONSTRUCTION 2007 
ARTICLE 9 124350 



Equipment Rental 








Tool Barn 


Bale Chopper 


290 




C. M. Davidson Inc. 




23,572.50 




Dwight Young 


Truck Gravel 


630 




Bill Cassidy 


Crane 


800 


25,292.50 


Sub-Base 






8,390 


Drainage 








Ferguson Waterworks 




10,007.23 




C. M. Davidson Inc. 




18,600 




Appleton Transport 


Truck Sand 


4,050 




Pike Industries, Inc 




22,733.52 




WB7RL Martin Inc 


Stone 


9,763.5 


65,154.25 


Alan Dyke 


Blasting 




15,168.55 


Fuel 






1,020.73 


Common Excavation 


i 




5,630. 


Clearing/ Grubbing 






2,637.50 


Material 






1,056.47 



TOTAL 



124,350 



BEAN BROOK BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION 
ARTICLE 10 174,400 



Equipment Rental 

Conn Valley 

C. M. Davidson Inc. 



Move exca. 



300 
19,800 



20,100 



45 



Concrete 






11,485 


Drainage 








Ferguson Waterworks 




1,719.19 




C. M. Davidson Inc. 




650 




Oakes Bros 




664.30 


3,033.59 


Fabricate PPC 


Voided Slabs 




46,281.00 


Fuel 






5,900.95 


Common Excavation 






7,055 


Clearing/ Grubbing 






6,000 


Material 


Backfill 




2,969.50 


Engineering 


- 






Joseph Carrara &Son 




2,200 




CM Davidson 




2,650 


5,850 


Erosion Control 






480 


WR & RL Martin 


Stone 




17,499.55 


Freguson Waterworks 






1,593 




Total to Date 




128,247.59 




Total Project 








Cost 




174,400 




Balance to 








Finish 




46,152.41 



46 



ROAD AGENT'S REPORT 
Regular Account 2007 Highway Expenditures 



Winter Budget 






C. M. Davidson, Inc. -Lease Equipment 




20,854.5 


C. M. Davidson, Inc 


Plowing/Labor 


55,274.5 


Kibby Equipment, Inc 


Parts 


287.15 


Cargill Salt 




5,084.13 


Blaisdell Sand 




2,504.7 


Howard Fairfield 


Repairs 


731.66 


Tenco New England 


Repairs-Plow Shoe 


194 


Cold patch 




62.78 


Repairs 




168.15 


Communications 




105 


Fuel Oil 




2,466.02 


PHNH 


Electricity 


819.81 




TOTAL 


88,552.4 


Summer Budget 






C. M. Davidson Inc. 


Drainage 


11,609.5 


Ferguson Waterworks 


Drainage 


319.05 


Conn Valley Trucking 


Move Equipment 


750 


C.M.Davidson, Inc. 


Grading 


31,961.09 


Rodimon Excavation 


Dump Truck 


630 


Morrill Construction 


Trucking 


780 


Blaisdell Gravel 




2,545.36 


Aggregates 






Blaisell Sand and Gravel 




7,093.09 


Pike Industries 




160.65 


Chief Logging 




263.44 


WaHathchland 


Ttopsoil 


336 


Repairs & Maintenance 




786.87 


Fuel 


Diesel 


3,303.49 


PHNH 


Electricity 


109.27 



TOTAL 



60,647.81 



47 



SUBSIDY ACCOUNT 



C.M.Davidson, Inc. 2,536.65 

Bigalow Paving-Indian Pond Rd /Lily Pond Rd 1 9,003 . 1 

Pike Industries 6,875.22 

In Rock, Inc Indian Pond Road 822 

PSNH- Electric 312.09 

Fuel & Oil 1,530.38 

Oakes Bros 13.56 



Total expenditures 3 1 ,093 



48 



Road Agent Report for year 2007 

Bad news first- Bean Brook Bridge. As many of you know the project did not get 
completed this summer. I take full responsibility for the delays that have 
occurred. In March of 05', when it became apparent that the town wished to 
proceed with the project, I called the State of New Hampshire, Department of 
Environmental Services, and verbally reviewed the project. It was the conclusion 
that a permit was not needed due to the work limits being outside of the existing 
abutments, and limits were way outside of the stream limits. A disclaimer was 
made by DES that plans should be sent in for review and a recorded 
determination. I felt the approximate amount of $5,000 needed for plans, could 
be better spent on the project itself. While removing the existing bridge, the 
existing abutments crumbled, and were not able to be used as a "coffer" dam. 
After the bridge was removed, within a window of intense rain, the site was 
reported to DES for possible infractions of siltation. On July i2ththe enforcement 
division of DES wetlands made a site visit and shut down the project while 
further investigations were made. Although no siltation violations were found, 
they did require more erosion control measures be installed. The enforcement 
officer from DES that had initially visited the site, left her post within DES soon 
after the visit. This led to some confusion and not a clear direction in which to 
proceed. After weeks of calls to DES, they sent another enforcement officer to 
the site to review if a permit was needed. No permit determination was made at 
this time, but a detailed set of plans was requested to allow others to determine if 
in fact a permit was needed. The plans were submitted on or about August 2S 
with an expedited review request. More stream flow data was needed, and a 
review letter from the NH Natural Heritage Bureau. This data was compiled and 
sent resulting in the application deemed administratively complete on November 
20. The expedited request was misfiled and never was sent to the commissioner's 
desk. After checking status of the project at various times it was clear that it had 
not made an expedited review. I resent the request directly to the commissioner 
and it was approved. The DES reviewer received the plans on or about December 
24, and a permit was issued December 26. We have proceeded with the project 
when it is feasible and prudent. Footings, stems, and wingwalls can be completed 
but the bridge deck absolutely needs sustained temperatures of 52° or more. This 
of course, will put us into April. At this time, the project will still be within 
budget as most of the materials that fluctuate, have been purchased I deeply 
apologize to all who have been inconvenienced, the obvious intention was to be 
completed in October of 2007. 

The winter budget for 07 was over around $28,000. As we all might know by 
now it is impossible to budget a NH winter. As I believe was always the case, the 



49 



December billings have fluctuated as to when they were paid. If expenditures 
were over budget, they were paid in the next fiscal year, if the expenditures were 
below budget; they were paid in the current year. We obviously did this to 
cushion any overages, and hope the next year was more accommodating. As seen 
by the last 12 years of budgets this has worked out fairly well. The Town 
Treasurer has suddenly taken exception to this policy and claimed payments from 
07' must go in the 07' budget. With December expenditures being one of the 

highest I remember, +7- $21,000, combined with, I believe, December 06' 
within this years expenditures the result is $28,000 over budget. 

Indian Pond project was a great success. The project was within 4% of 
budget, with the slight overage taken from the Subsidy Account The 
overage caused by a more destructive than normal thunder storm that 
wiped out about 300' of newly installed under drain and sand. 



The summer budget requested is $62,000; 




Aggregates 


$20,000 


Mowing 


$5,000 


Grading 


$5,000 


Repairs 


$4,000 


Equipment lease 


$25,000 


Town Garage 


$1,000 


Propane 


$2,800 



The winter budget requested is $65,000; 

4 Months @ $ 12,000 per month $48,000 

Sand $ 8,400 

Salt $ 8,400 



There are three warrant articles concerning roads. Two of the articles are 
provided to give the town a choice. The first article request $173,000 to 
reconstruct 2000 linear feet of Indian Pond. This project complies with the 
10 Year plan. The simple scope of work is to pulverize existing pavement, 
geo-textile fabric, minor drainage improvements, select materials, and 
base and wear course of pavement. The existing road has deformed 



50 



severely with the wheel path rutted. Winter maintenance is very difficult 

within this section; salt usage increases three fold, and to actually get a 

clean road. 

The next article is within the same area but just provides a choice of a 

scaled down version. 

The third article is to start finding towards the reconstruction of Barton 

Road Bridge. The Bridge target reconstruction date is 201 1. This simply 

starts saving towards that endeavor. I will contact the State of New 

Hampshire to get estimates going through the state bridge program, with 

my preliminary to estimate using town forces is $225,000. 

Respectfully submitted 

Chris Davidson 

Road Agent 



ROAD AGENT BUDGET FOR 2008 



Winter: 




Equipment Lease 




Average $12,000/ month Eq 




Jan, Feb .5, March .5,Nov, Dec= 4Months @12,000. 


$48,000 


Sand 600Cubic Yards @ 1 4 


$8,400 


Salt 7 Loads @$ 1,200 


$8,400 


Misc 


$200 



TOTAL $65,000 

Summer: 

Aggregates (labor and fuel included) 20,000 

Mowing 5,000 

Grading (labor and fuel included) 5,000 

Repairs 4,000 

Equipment Lease (fuel included) 25,000 

Town Garage (Electrical service update) 1 ,000 

Propane 2,800 

TOTAL $62,800 



51 



PIERMONT SEWAGE DISTRICT- FINANCIAL REPORT 
2007 RECEIPTS 

INCOME 



Grant 


680,698.79 


Interest Inc 


162.61 


Other Inc 
TOTAL INCOME 

EXPENSES 


37,743.09 
718,604.49 


Advetising 


26343 


Bond Payment 


267,717.62 


Dues 


100.00 


Fine 


800.00 


Legal 


1,150.77 


License Renewal 


50 00 


Maintenance 


70.00 


Mileage 


1,21241 


Payroll Taxes 


1,875.75 


Pumping 


3,060.00 


Rent 


1,500 00 


Salary 


8,180.66 


Sewage Project 


424,213 82 


Testing 


2,552.00 


Training 


90.00 


Utilities 


163.87 


TOTAL EXPENSES 


713,000.33 



OVERALL TOTAL 5,604. 1 6 



52 



Sewage Department - 2008 Budget 

Operation & Maintenance: 400 

Operator's Salary 8,200 

Assistant Operator's Salary 800 

FICA Expense 800 

Waste Water Testing 1 ,200 

Waste Water Testing Mileage 1 ,000 

Bookkeeping 325 

Tax Collector 325 
Legal Expense 

Electricity 200 

Pumping Tanks 3,000 

Mowing & Cleanup 1 , 1 00 

Plowing 1,082 

Land Lease 1,568 

Special Projects Cut Brush,Rem Debri,Etc 800 

Training 1 00 

Granite State Rural Water Assoc. Dues 100 

Subtotal 21,000 

Rural Development 6,642 

Bond Bank Payment 1 ,880 

Bond Bank Payment 4,72 1 

NHDES Aid Grant 30% -8,500 

TOTAL 25,743 



Sewage Fees for 2008: 

Long Term Debt-: 2 1 ,000 divide 35 600 

Operation & Maintenance: 4743 divid 36.5 130 

730 



53 



PIERMONT PUBLIC LIBRARY 
ANNUAL REPORT 2007 

January of 2007 brought technology changes to Piermont Public Library. PPL 

upgraded the library bldg: piermontlibrarv.hlospot.com. Library staff and 

Piermont Village School students continue to contribute to this blog, which 

includes information about library hours, library events, new material (books, 

DVDs, video, audio-books, music CDs, etc.). 

In February, Our Gates Staying Connected Technology Grant for the NH State 

Library Downloadable Audio Books Program began after librarians received 

training by Bobbi Slossar, NH State Library. Now, the MP-3 players are often on 

loan to patrons. During 2007, 33 patrons have checked out 261 Downloadable 

audio books, most of which are downloaded at home. Remarkable access to 

listening material. 

We signed on to the Piermont Historical Society's program, Adopt- A-Piermont 

School, collecting information and giving support to townspeople who were 

researching a "chosen" school. The first school was approved by a special town 

meeting on Nov. 25, 1775. There were a total of 17 schools to research for a 

grand local history project. 

March brought a guest speaker, NH author Titia Bozuwa, who spoke to our 7/8 

graders before their spring trip to Washington, D.C. All students read her book, 

In the Shadow of the Cathedral, about growing up during World War II in 

Holland. Adult patrons read her memoir, Wings of Change, life as a young wife 

of a physician struggling to be American. A book discussion and potluck supper 

was held at Helga Mueller's home. 

A Celtic Musical Program ushered in a cool April evening. On his 12-string 

guitar, Sean Kelly, sang Irish and Scottish ballads accompanied by his wife, 

Marianne. We had an exceptional audience at the old church building. 

Refreshments were served. 

May's book discussion was A Century of November, winner of the Michigan 

Literary Fiction Award, by W.D. Wetherell, a writer from Lyme, NH. Discussion 

was led by Joe Medlicott, of Piermont Library Board and Discussion Leader for 

head, institute for Lifelong Education At Dartmouth. 

Memorial Day Weekend was full of festivals: our annual book sale ($276) and 

the culmination of the Adopt- A-Piermont School Project. 

The June PPL Board Meeting was delayed when a bear detained Helga Mueller, 

Board Chairman, in her garage. We are sporting new boards in our outdoor sign 

installed by George Tompkins and painted by Joyce Tompkins and Margaret, 

Librarian. George also made two bulletin boards for library displays. 

Summer Reading hummed along in July with 33 participants, with each receiving 

a "Reading Road Trip" bookmark and a bike license, a mechanical pencil and 



54 



colored mini-pen. As a final reward, all readers enjoyed an ice cream from our 

own Four Corner Store. Top readers were awarded t-shirts. It was a yummy 

Reading Road Trip Summer. 

September brought an increase in donations of books in good condition. Many 

were added to our diverse collection. A thank you goes to the townspeople for 

their generosity and support. 

Abraham Lincoln came to Piermont in October, organized by Lydia Hill, school 

librarian. Miss Alyvia and Sergeant Michael, both eighth grade students dressed 

in authentic Civil war costumes, introduced Abe to students, community 

members and two local news reporters. "All stand!" commanded Sergeant 

Michael as President Lincoln strode into the room. The rousing and 

contemplative talk by Lincoln was followed by lost of questions from students. 

Check our library blog for pictures of Mr. Lincoln and students. 

The end of the year brought publicity, building improvements, and progress on 

projects. 

In the November/December issue of Upper Valley Life magazine, local writer 

Polly Tafrate wrote a "Tale of Two Libraries," featuring Piermont and Bradford. 

Helga Mueller also writes about our library doings for the Journal Opinion, 

which we appreciate. 

The town installed new porch railings, which have dressed up our building. A job 

well done. The Board Trustees, Helga Mueller, Betty Hall, Marian Shields, Joe 

Medlicott, Joyce Tompkins, Stephanie Gordon, and Nancy Sandell, have been 

working through the year on the library's Long Range Plan, making good 

progress. 

Circulation: Piermont Public Library: 9156 

Piermont Village School: 2264 

Total 11420 

2007 Materials acquired: (books, CDs, DVDs, etc.) 608 

(Of the 608 items, 210 were purchased.) 

2006 Collection 14620 

Total 15228 

Visits by Patrons 3486 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Margaret Ladd, Librarian 

James Meddaugh, Assistant Librarian 



55 



PIEFHOttT PUBLIC LIBRARY riHANCTAL REPORT 
EXPENDITURES: JANUARY - DECEMBER 2007 



2402 



LIBRARY EMPLOYEES: 

Librarian 13,324.00 

Assistant Librarian 8,09b.b0 

Social Security * Medicare 1,6.38.09 

Worker's Compensation 



LIBRARY SERVICES: 

Books 3,342.68 

Magazines & Newspapers 365.02 

Audio/Video 234.00 

PROGRAMS/ PROJECTS: 257.09 

OFFICE EXPENSE: 

Office Expense 390.82 

Library Supplies 784.21 

Office Equipment 2,381.46 

Accounting Fees 2,500.00 

Advertising 

Postage/Box Rental 126.42 

Miscellaneous 7.75 

MAINTENANCE: 

Cleaning Service 1,300.00 

Snow Removal 

Repair & Maintenance 45.39 

UTILITIES: 

Eirfdricity 300.41 

Fuel Oil 2,411.35 

Telephone 610.23 

Internet Service 261.30 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 

Travel 200.00 

Dues & Fees 255.00 
Course Fees 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 5 39,339.30 



56 



PIERMONT PUBLIC LIBRARY FINANCIAL REPORT 
REVENUE: JANUARY - DECEMBER 2007 



Memorial Gifts 
Fines & Replacements 
Copier Fees 
Book Sales 

Encumbered Funds Prior Year 
Programs For Public 
Transfer For Non-fiction 
Piermont School 
Miscellaneous Income 
Town Appropriation 

TOTAL REVENUE 



Cash Account Balance 12/31/07 



9ft07 

1,086.18 

25.00 
276.00 

1,560.87 

700.00 

12.54 

33,500.00 

T" ""37.160T5V 

$ 10,062.22 




This is Sophia Gardener who was awarded Piermont' s Boston Cane in 2007. 

The Boston Cane goes to the oldest resident in Town who has lived here over 25 years. 



57 



Piermont Public Library 

Category 2008 Budget 

Book Sales 500 

Copier 200 

Donations & Misc. 1 ,000 

Interest Earned 15 

Reimb. From Restricted 7,350 

School Use 700 

Town Draw 33.500 

Total Receipts 43,265 

Gross Wages 23,816 
Payroll Taxes 1,822 
Accounting 2,500 
Worker's Comp 80 
Books Rented 800 
Books Purchased 3,500 
Mags/Newspapers 450 
Downloadable Audio 400 
Video & DVD 200 
Library Supplies 700 
Office Expense 700 
Office Equipment 1,000 
Cleaning 1 ,400 
Rubbish & Snow 100 
Landscape 100 
Repair & Maint. 300 
Electricity 800 
Fuel Oil 2,500 
Telephone 650 
Internet Service 300 
Travel 150 
Dues & Fees 250 
Course Fees 1 00 
Advertising 60 
PO Box & Safe Dep. 100 
Postage 1 25 
Programs 250 
Miscellaneous 200 
Totals Expenses 43,353 

Operating Balance (88) 

58 



ANIMAL CONTROL REPORT 2007 

Dear Citizens of Piermont, I submit my animal control report for 2007 

I handled a variety of calls this year from suspected cruelty to nuisance 

calls. I work closely with the police, humane society and NEW 

HAMPSHIRE SPCA and also the dept of agriculture if needed. 

I issued one written warning for dog running loose and issued one fine for 

failure to license. I try not to issue a lot of fines but sometimes this is the 

only way people will obey the law. This year there were 1 9 people on the 

list for unlicensed dogs. Almost everyone complied once I spoke to them, 

but some had to be reminded again. The law says once the select board 

signs the warrant you are subject to a fine of $25.00 per dog. I'm not 

required to come and remind you as you have already had a letter and 

phone call by the time warrant is signed to comply. Once the civil fine is 

issued you have 15 days from the date issued to comply, if not, a summons 

shall be issued to district court. 

For the year I responded to 42 calls. 

Sincerely 

Wayne B. Godfrey 

ACO 

Town of Piermont 



59 



FIRE CHIEFS REPORT 

In 2007 the fire department took delivery of our new engine, which has been a 
huge asset to the town the truck had a very busy first year and worked nearly 
perfect with only a couple small glitches. 

In 2007 eleven piermont firefighters participated in state certifications totaling 
over 3000 hours of training, which took the fire department from 0% state 
certified to 72% state certified fire fighters. Please be sure to thank these guys 
this was a big commitment for them and there families, classes two nights a week 
and on Saturdays for nearly a year. In 2007 calls were up again we had more 
structure fire calls than ever this year be sure too check your smoke detectors, in 
most cases when people die in fires they did not have working smoke detectors 
so protect yourselves and check them often. 

Calls for 2007were as follows: 8 structure fires, 10 car accidents, 4 odor 
investigations, 4 medical aid, 7 cover assignments, 6 down power lines, 1 car 
fire, 3 misc, calls And as always we are looking for a little more help so don't 
hesitate to give a call if interested in joining. 
Respectively Submitted 
Keith Brick Fire Chief 




Thanks goes out to the following fire fighters for completing the extra 
280 hour training: 

Keith Brick Jeff Huntington Bruce Henry Richard Dion 
Aaron Rich Glen Putnam Matt Prince Andy Mauchly 

Cory Austin Michelle Metcalf Dana Hartley 



60 



Piermont Police Department 
Proposed Budget 



Category 



2008 



Detail 



2007 



Difference 



SALARIES 








Chief 


$18,200.00 


$17.50/hrx20hrs/wk 






Part Time Officer 


$7,280.00 


$14/hrx lOhrsAvk 






Part Time Officer 


$7,280.00 


$14/hrx lOhrs/wk 






Holiday 


$0.00 








Details 


$0.00 








TOTAL 


$32,760.00 




$19,546.50 


$13,213.50 




TRAINING 








Chief 


$350.00 


$17.50/hrx20hrs 






Part Time Officer 


$280.00 


$14/hrx20hrs 






Part Time Officer 


$280.00 


$14/hrx20hrs 






TOTAL 


$910.00 








8 hrs mandatory/year + 1 2 hj 


rs (1 hr/month x 12 months) 












FIREARMS TRAINING 








Chief 


$140.00 


$17.50/hrx8hrs 






Part Time Officer 


$112.00 


$14/hrx8hrs 






Part Time Officer 


$112.00 


$14/hrx8hrs 






TOTAL 


$364.00 




$1,565.00 


($291.00) 


8 hrs mandatory/year per PSTC 







OPERATIONAL 






Gasoline 


$2,000.00 




$1,150.21 $849.79 


Cruiser Maintenance 


$850.00 




$836.95 $13.05 


Uniforms 


$1,000.00 




$0.00 $1,000.00 


Firearms and Ammunition 


$800.00 




$0.00 $800.00 


Office Supplies 


$1,000.00 




$2,561.66 ($1,561.66) 


Telephone & Internet 


$1,850.00 




$1,815.38 $34.62 


Repairs & Maintenance 


$0.00 




290.06 ($290.06) 


Community Programs 


$200.00 




$0.00 $200.00 


Legal 


$0.00 




$0.00 $0.00 


Dispatching 


$0.00 




$0.00 $0.00 


New/Replace Equipment 


$1,000.00 




$6,464.92 ($5,464.92) 


Dues/Workshops 


$1,000.00 




$0.00 $1,000.00 


FICA Expense 


$2,450.00 




$1,457.91 $992.09 


Miscellaneous 


$500.00 




$363.89 $136.11 


TOTAL 


$12,650.00 




$14,940.98 ($2,290.98) 



GRAND TOTAL $46,684.00 $36,052.48 $10,631.52 



61 



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62 



Piermont FAST Annual Report 2007 

The past year offered new challenges to our FAST family. We bid a very 
fond yet sad farewell to Tom and Sandy Elliott, who had been strong, 
capable and compassionate members for 12 years. Their leave-taking left a 
void that required four people to fill. I continue to miss Tom and Sandy 
deeply, but am continually gratified by the willing and able assistance 
offered by our members as we work together to meet our numerous 
requirements. 

Currently our membership includes Barbara Fitzpatrick, EMT-B, Alex 
Medlicott, EMT-B, John Monaghan, EMT-B, Ellen Putnam, EMT-I, and 
our newest member, Dana Hartley, EMT-B. As always, we encourage 
anyone who is interested in making a positive impact on our community to 
contact us so that we may help you enroll in an EMS class. We welcome 
your participation. 

In 2007 we responded to 46 EMS calls, most of them medical, and one of 
them mutual aid to Bradford. We provided educational and helpful 
materials to the school and our community, and made presentations in the 
school during National EMS week. We purchased two new AED units, 
one to replace our outdated station-based unit, and one to donate to our 
Police Department for them to carry in their cruiser. We are working to 
help the school and Four Corners Store obtain CPR training for all 
employees, so they will be well prepared to use their on-site AED units if 
necessary. We have had regular trainings ourselves, some with Piermont 
Fire Department members, so that we maintain our skills and 
certifications. We have taken on our new statewide protocols, and in 
complying with them have provided each member with Epi-Pens for use 
in treating anaphylaxis. 

We have asked this year for an additional $500, as keeping Epi-Pens will 
cost us at least that much annually, even with careful purchasing practices. 
Our budget of $2500 will be used for educational costs, supplies including 
oxygen, and necessary equipment. 

Your Piermont FAST members would take this opportunity to strongly 
encourage all households to consider purchasing a subscription to Upper 
Valley Ambulance (UVA). This annual $40 program covers every 
member in your household for necessary emergency transport by UVA 
with no further cost to you. If you have no insurance coverage, or your 
insurance doesn't completely cover the transport, the amount not covered 



63 



is written off. This may be the cheapest insurance you will ever find. If 
you have questions, ask a FAST member, or call UVA. The subscription 
forms are available at the Town Clerk's office. 

We welcome your interest in our squad, and would be happy to answer 
any questions you might have. We meet the last Tuesday of each month at 
7:00pm at the Fire Station. 
Respectfully Submitted, 
Ellen A. Putnam, Captain 



Proposed Fire Department Budget 2008 



Telephone/Internet. 750 

Air Compressor 250 

Heating Oil-Propane 4500 

Electricity 2500 

Payroll 7500 

Fire Chief Salary 1000 

FICA 600 

Forestry 900 

Radio Repair-Supplies 500 

Training • 2000 

Mileage 1000 

New Equipment 6500 

Fire Ponds 1000 

State Fire Assoc. Dues 300 

Gasoline 400 

Diesel 2880 

Test Equipment 400 

Truck Supplies and Repairs 2500 

Mutual Aid Dues 250 

Computer Supplies 250 

Fast Squad 2500 

Total Proposed Budget 38,480 



64 



FOREST FIRE WARDEN REPORTS 

I want to thank Piermont residents for their cooperation in preventing 

uncontrolled burns. Although burning permits are not needed when the 

ground is covered with snow, it is advisable to notify Hanover Dispatch at 

353-4347 of your planned burn. The smoke from your fire can cause 

concern from your neighbors or passing motorists and they may call 911. 

Prior notification will hopefully prevent an unnecessary alarm and visit 

from the fire dept. 

Permits are required for all other outside burning and campfire permits are 

written for the entire season. Please seek a permit for larger fires the day 

before or the day of the planned burn, as weather and wind conditions are 

factors. 

Permits may be obtained from Roy or Eileen Belyea (272-4886), Wayne 

Godfrey (272-5802), Michelle Metcalf (272-4301) and Berk Nicol (764- 

5721). 

Roy Belyea, Piermont Fire Warden 



65 



Report of Forest Fire Warden and State Forest Ranger 

Your local Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department, and the Stale of New Hampshire Division of Forests & Lands work collaboratively to 
reduce the risk and frequency of wildland fires in New Hampshire. To help us assist you, please contact your local Forest Fire Warden or 
Fire Department to determine if a permit is required before doing ANY outside burning. Under State law (RSA 227 -L: IT) a fire permit is 
required for all outside burning unless the ground is completely covered with snow. The New Hampshire Department of Environmental 
Services also prohibits the open burning of household waste. Citizens are encouraged to contact the local fire department or DES at 1- 
800-498-6868 or www.des.state.nh.us for more information. Safe open burning requires diligence and responsibility. Help us to protect 
New Hampshire's forest resources, For more information please contact the Division of Forests & Lands at (603) 271-2214, or online at 
www.nbdil.org. 



Fire activity was very busy during the spring of the 2007, particularly late April into early May. As the forests and fields greened up in 
later May the fire danger decreased. However, a very dry late summer created very high fire danger again from August into September, 
with fire danger reaching very high on Labor Day weekend. Even with the dry conditions, the acreage burned was less than half that of 
2006. The largest forest fire during the 2007 season burned approximately 26 acres on the side of Wantastiquet Mountain in Chesterfield 
during the month of May. Our statewide system of 16 fire lookout towers is credited with keeping most fires small and saving several 
structures this season due to their quick and accurate spotting capabilities. Many homes in New Hampshire are located in the wildland 
urban interface, which is the area where homes and flammable wildland fuels intermix. Several of the fires during the 2007 season 
threatened structures, a constant reminder that forest fires bum more than just trees. Homeowners should take measures to prevent a 
wildland fire from spreading to their home. Precautions include keeping your roof and gutters clear of leaves and pine needles, and 
maintaining adequate green space around your home free of flammable materials. Additional information and homeowner 
recommendations are available at www.rtrewise.org . Please help Smokey Bear, your local fire department and the state's Forest Rangers 
by being fire wise and fire safe! 

2007 FIRE STATISTICS 

(All fires reported as of November 8. 2007) 

(figures do not include fires on the White Mountain Nati onal Forest) 



COUNTY STATISTICS 


Comaty 


Acre* [ • of Fires 


Belknap 


30 95 


c*m>n 


11 S3 


Cheshire 


44 36 


Coot 


6 13 


Oration 


4 30 


Hillsborough 


61 71 


Merrimack 


16 73 


Rockingham 


16 22 


Stratford 


19 32 


Sullivan 


5 10 




I Acres 
I # of Fires 



CAUSES OF FIRES REPORTED 



Arson 


5 


Debris 


197 


Camp fire 


38 


Children 


22 


Smoking 


41 


Railroad 


5 


Equipment 


3 


Lightning 


7 


Misc.* 


119 





Total Fires 


Total Acres 


2007 


437 


212 


2006 


SOO 


473 


2005 


546 


174 


2004 


482 


147 


2003 


374 


100 



1 19 (•Misc.: power lines, fireworks, electric fences, etc.) 

ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDLAND FIRE 



66 



PIERMONT PLANNING BOARD 2007 

Meetings of the Board are held on the third Wednesday of every month at 
7:30 p.m. at the Old Church Building on Route 10. Members of the Board 
at year-end were: 

William Morris, Chairman Peggy Fullerton 

Peter Labounty, Vice Chair Ed French 

Fred Shipman Suzanne Woodard 

Jean Daley, alternate Mark Fagnant, ex-officio 

At the April election of officers William Morris was re-elected chairman 
and Peter Labounty, vice chairman. Selectman Mark Fagnant joined the 
Board as the ex-officio member in March. 

The Board took the following actions in 2007: 

Flood Plain Management Ordinance - Following a public hearing in 
January, the Board adopted amendments to the Piermont Flood Plain 
Management Ordinance in order to be in compliance with the National 
Flood Insurance Program. The voters at the March Town Meeting 
approved the amendments. 

Piermont Master Plan - Work continued on updating the 1991 Master 
Plan. At year-end the Board started compiling the completed sections. 
Still to be developed is the section on Conservation and Preservation. 

The Board is waiting for the Conservation Commission to 
complete a Natural Resource Inventory, which when finished, will serve 
as the Conservation Plan for the Town and as the Natural Resources 
chapter of the Master Plan. 

Other Business - In February the Board held a public hearing on a 
petition to amend the Piermont Zoning Ordinance by adding provisions for 
a building permit system and the hiring of a part-time building inspector. 

The voters at Town Meeting defeated the petition, which appeared 
as an article on the 2007 Town Warrant. 



67 



The Board worked on making changes in existing Articles 4 through 8 of 
the Piermont Subdivision Regulations in order to clarify discrepancies in 
language and to make it easier for applicants to find information on 
procedures to follow when applying for subdivision. 

Approvals granted by the Board in 2007: 

Jacques Ludman, 4-lot major subdivision on Cape Moonshine 
Road, Tax map R6, Lot 1 ; James Trussell, 2-lot subdivision on Winn 
Road, Tax Map R20, Lot 49-1; Spiess/ Underhill, lot line adjustment off 
Indian Pond Road, Tax Map R8, Lots 12/13; Ciola and Pryor, lot line 
adjustment, on Route 25C, Tax Map R12, Lots 14/17; Shawn Rogers, 
voluntary merger, on Arron Road, Tax Map Rl 1, Lots 14 and 24-50; John 
Ellsworth, voluntary merger, on Route 10, Tax Map R20, Lots 3 and 4; 
Cameron Prest, voluntary merger, on Route 10, Tax Map R20, Lots 52 and 
52a. 

In addition to above approvals, the Board held a conceptual hearing on a 
proposed 26-lot subdivision on Route 10 by Stacey Thomson Properties 
Ltd, Tax Map R2, Lot 3; a conceptual hearing on a proposed -2-lot 
subdivision on Route 10, by Tim Lamarre, Tax Map R20, Lot33A; and a 
conceptual hearing on a lot line adjustment on Route 25C by Don 
Mitchell, Tax Map R13, Lots 10/12. 

William Morris, Chairman 



68 



ANNUAL REPORT of the ZONING BOARD of 
ADJUSTMENT 2007 

On September 10, 2007, the NH Supreme Court issued a decision on the 

Camp Walt Whitman case remanding "the matter to the ZBA to determine 

whether the Camp impermissibly expanded its nonconforming use. The 

ZBA may, in its discretion, hold such further proceedings as it deems 

necessary." The Board now awaits notice from the Superior Court that we 

may proceed. 

In the matter of the Musty-Faustini v. Piermont, the Superior Court in 

October denied several motions by Musty-Faustini, but has not yet set a 

date for a hearing on the merits. 

In other business: 

The ZBA denied an application by John Aldrich for a Variance to 

subdivide a lot on the west side of Lake Armington. The lot lacks the 

required Town road frontage. 

The ZBA approved an application by Mike and Terry Hogan for a Special 

Exception to operate a hair saloon and commercial vegetable prep kitchen 

at 15 Church Street. 

The ZBA approved an application by Fred Shipman for a Special 

Exception to operate a flea market at 2 River Road. 

The ZBA voted to continue a hearing on an application by Annette 

Coughlin for a Special Exception to operate a music school at the 

Congregational Church, until such time that an issue with the building's 

septic system is clarified. 

The ZBA approved an application by Fred Shipman for a Special 

Exception to operate a market for itinerant vendors at 2 River Road. 

The ZBA heard a conceptual and informal proposal by Tim Southerland 

who would like to purchase two existing lots on Lake Tarleton, combine 

them, tear down an existing house and build a new, larger house 50 feet 

from water's edge. Southerland was advised of the Town's 75-foot water 

setback requirement, NH Shoreline Protection statutes and NH Wetlands 

Bureau regulations. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Frederick W. Shipman, 

Chairman 



69 



PIERMONT CONSERVATION COMMISSION 2007 

Monthly meeting of the Commission are held on the second Wednesday of every 
month at 7 p.m. at the Old Church Building on Route 10. 
Members of the Commission at year-end are:Helga Mueller, chair; David 
Ritchie, treasurer; Bill Morris; Eric Underhill; Ernie Hartley; Chris Jacobs; and 
Charles Grant. 

As of December 3 1 , 2007, the Town's Conservation Fund contains 
$1,677.49. The Underhill Canoe Site Fund, in a CD at the Woodsville Guarantee 
Savings Bank, contains $3,700. 14.1n addition, the Expendable Trust Fund for the 
maintenance of the Piermont Town Forest and Trails on Bedford Road contains 
$4,49 1.90. Contributing to the Conservation Fund are 10% of the revenue from 
current use changes and 10% from logging on Town-owned properties. In 2007, 
the Fund realized $53 1 from current use changes. 

Natural Resource Inventory 

Members of the Commission are continuing to work on the Natural Resource 
Inventory, started in 2006, with many sections already completed.We anticipate 
completing the inventory in 2008 and are asking the Townspeople at the 2008 
Town Meeting to support our effort and appropriate $1,750 for technical support 
from the Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission in 
compiling the inventory 

Piermont Town Forest and Trails 

The site on Bedford Road is managed by the Commission for recreational and 
educational purposes.lt serves as an outdoor science lab for Village School 
students to learn about nature and forest stewardship. This year, a new crop of 
kindergartners learned about maintaining a healthy forest by planting red pine 
seedlings under the guidance of Ernie Hartley and forester Eric Underhill. 
Organized by Pam Hartley, Village School instructional aide, an all day, all 
school, nature study workshop was also held at the site. The site incurred a lot of 
damage in April due to a nor' easter. Eric Underhill and Ernie Hartley and other 
members of the Commission did remedial work and logging. 
Townspeople are encouraged to use the trails for hiking, horseback riding, cross- 
country skiing and snowmobiling. 

Canoe Campsites 

Both the Underhill Canoe campsite and the Sarah Moore Canoe Access, which 
are managed by the Commission, had a successful year with many positive 
comments from canoeists. The sites are open from May *1 to November 1 . 



70 



Water Quality Monitoring 

Members of the Commission together with members of the Lake Tarleton and 
Lake Armington Associations monitored the water quality of Lakes Tarleton, 
Katherine, and Armington. In 2007, volunteers George and Joyce Tompkins, 
Mike Poole, and Helga Mueller collected water samples in June, July, and 
August.This year, the NHDES Volunteer Lake Assessment Program entered into 
an agreement with the research laboratory at Plymouth State University where 
the samples were taken for analysis. Since water quality monitoring started in 
2002, the water quality in all three lakes has consistently been good with only 
minor spikes in e-coli bacteria usually occurring at the State Park beach in July. 

Other matters 

In November two Commission members attended the Annual Meeting of the 
N.H. Association of Conservation Commissions and participated in workshops 
on Natural Resource Based Planning, the Comprehensive Shoreline Protection 
Act, Wetlands Permitting, and the NH Wildlife Action Plan. 

The Commission applauds the Lake Tarleton Association for its continuing effort 
to protect the lake from milfoil and other invasive plants by participating in the 
N.H. Lakes Association's "Lake Host Program." Charley Muntz, coordinator of 
the program, reports that thanks to a $3,000 grant from the N.H. Lakes 
Association, the Association was able to employ three Piermont residents to staff 
the Lake Tarleton Boat Access from June through Labor Day checking boats 
entering and leaving the lake for milfoil.The $3,000 grant was matched by 
several volunteers who contributed $2,427 in volunteer hours. A total of 660 boat 
and trailer inspections were conducted and fortunately no invasive weeds were 
found. 

During the year, members of the Commission received and followed up on 
several wetlands complaints and monitored logging activities in Town.Property 
owners are reminded that permits from the DES Wetlands Bureau are required 
for any projects that seek to excavate, remove, dredge, fill, or construct any 
structure in or on the bank of any surface water or wetland.If in doubt about any 
activity near a stream or wetland, please contact a member of the 
Commission.We are also available to assist with establishing conservation 
easements or for any other conservation concerns. 

Helga Mueller, Chairman 



71 



PIERMONT CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
BUDGET FOR 2008 

The Piermont Conservation Commission is requesting a line item in the 2008 
Town Budget in the amount of $2,000 for the following expenses: 
Technical support for completing Natural Resource Inventory $1,750.00 

Workshops, dues, books 250.00 

Total $2,000.00 

Planning Document 

• Edit current Natural Resource Chapters prepared by the Conservation 
Commission. 

• Prepare the background natural resources narrative and associated tables 
and charts. Provide descriptive statistics. 

• Conduct an assessment identifying the natural resource protection tools 
in place. 

• Outline options for conservation action. 

• Provide 2 copies of bound document. 

Assessment and options for conservation action will require meeting 
with the Board for comment 

35 hours @ $50!hr = $1,750.00 

(This is under the assumption that the Conservation Commission will 

provide Word documents or some 

electronic form of what has been written to date.) 



72 



Piermont Recreation Committee 2007 Report 

The Piermont Recreation Committee's goal is to provide a large variety of 

recreation activities for all ages. This past spring we continued T-ball for 

youngsters and added Minor league baseball to Piermont. It was great to see 

baseball back at Piermont! Track and field was also offered for students in grades 

4-8 and they attended the Middle School Championships in Claremont NH. This 

spring we sponsored a successful cribbage tournament with about 28 players 

participating. 

During the summer we sponsored a horseshoe tournament, which was won by our 

own Piermonters Rob and Ben Elder. We also paid for a three week swim program 

at Indian Pond so all Piermont residents could take swim lessons at no cost. 

In the fall the PRD held the 2nd annual soccer tournament. The tournament was a 

great success as we increased the tournament to 8 teams this year. This 

tournament provides co-ed teams the opportunity to compete against their own 

level. During the peak of foliage season we offered a trip up Mt. Cube in Orford. 

About 15 hikers enjoyed the trip up to a great view and gorgeous weather. A 

second cribbage tournament was held this fall as well. 

This winter we are putting a skating rink together by the bank. Fred Shipman has 

generously offered his great location for the rink. We are hoping to have it ready 

by mid- January. This winter we also are donating $400.00 for a new scoreboard 

at the Piermont Village School from fundraising money. 

This coming year we are looking to start a Major league baseball team in 

Piermont, provide scholarships to Piermont students who would like to attend 

summer camps, provide a babysitting course to be certified, and continue to 

provide recreation activities to the town. 

We would like to thank all those who volunteered and the coaches for all their 

time, energy, and hard work! THANK YOU! ! 

The PRD is always looking for new ideas and volunteers. We meet on the 3' 

Monday of the month at 7pm. Please feel free to come to any meeting. 

Proposed budget for Piermont Recreation Department for 2008 

• Baseball (dues, uniforms for majors, equipment) $ 1 ,450.00 

• Swim program $ 1 ,750.00 

• Soccer tournament $ 500.00 

• Track (meet dues) $ 200.00 
•Infield dirt $1,250.00 

• Dugouts, foul poles $ 950.00 

• Miscellaneous (paint, lime etc., advertising) $ 500.00 

• Soccer goals $ 500.00 



73 



PIERMONT HISTORICAL SOCIETY 2007 

The Society was founded as a non-profit society to preserve the heritage 
of the people of Piermont.The society is not supported by the town's 
taxpayers, but relies on yearly dues collected from members, fundraisers, 
and donations from generous benefactors. 

At the Annual Meeting held on April 29 a slate of officers was 
elected.Helga Mueller will serve as President, Gary Danielson as Vice- 
president, Fred Shipman as Treasurer, and Joyce Tompkins as Secretary. 
Lloyd Hall continues as Director of Preservation and Betty Hall as 
Director at Large. Proposed changes to the bylaws were accepted. A copy 
of the bylaws is available for those interested. Annual meetings will be 
scheduled each year in April or the beginning of May. 

On Memorial Day a rather extraordinary exhibit opened at the Historical 
Society. The Adopt- A-Piermont- School Project was developed and 
supported by the Piermont Library, the Piermont Historical Society, and 
the Piermont Village School.The best part of the project, however, was the 
wonderful involvement of members of the community.During its history 
Piermont had more than 14 schools, and Piermont families or individuals 
adopted each school. The participants then researched their schools and 
produced presentations for display in the Historical Society.We were 
fortunate enough to have access to school registers and town reports 
dating back to 1861 as well as the Piermont History 1764- 1947 . During 
research sessions it was hard not to share the interesting tidbits one came 
upon, including comments written by teachers and questions answered in 
registers. We delighted in reading that although some schools had no maps 
or research materials they did have plenty of ventilation! Students from the 
current Piermont Village School conducted interviews of longtime 
Piermont residents who had attended Village schools. These interviews 
were video taped and became part of the exhibit.Following the Piermont 
Memorial Day Parade the public was invited to view the exhibits, and 
researchers shared with each other their findings. More than ninety people 
came through the exhibit and pored over the informative and creative 
display boards. Positive comments abounded.lt was a wonderful example 
of community spirit and we are richer for the experience. 

The next focus of the Society should be to catalog the many materials that 
have been acquired.We thank the many Piermont residents who have 
shared their historical treasures with the Society. 



74 



Although the Society continues to maintain rooms over the library we 
now enjoy a spacious room in the Old Church Building in which to hold 
our exhibits. 

We invite you to become part of the Society. Membership dues are $5.00 
for a regular member, $3.00 for a junior member and $50.00 for life 
membership. If you are over eighty years of age you are entitled to a free 
membership. Dues may be mailed to the Piermont Historical Society c/o 
Fred Shipman, Treasurer, P.O. Box 273, Piermont, N.H. 03779. 
Those wishing to visit the Historical Society may call Helga Mueller at 
272-4359 or Joyce Tompkins at 989-5804.We are open to suggestions 
from Piermont residents for future exhibitions and are currently 
considering a series of guided tours of historic sites within the town. 

Helga Mueller - President 



TRANSFER AND RECYCLE REPORT-2007 

Dear Piermont Residents: I'm pleased to submit my 2007 Recycling 
Report. 

Things at the Recycling this year has been going quite well. We still have 
a few minor problems with people putting non-recyclable items in the 
plastic and paper containers. This year prices have held steady and high 
for paper and steel. Plastic still is not paying at all, but if I can ship both a 
paper and plastic load together. I get two loads hauled for the price of one. 
That is why sometimes when you come in, the plastic will be piled way 
high. I'm trying to get the best deal for your tax money. Also, the high 
cost of steel helped keep our totals down as some people who have large 
amounts of scrap iron choose to truck it themselves and get paid. Where, if 
it were low, they would bring it in to Piermont. 

Trash for the year was 126.1 1 tons, up from last year's totals of 1 19.34. 
We are seeing an increase in people using our facility who used to have 
their trash picked up, but are now finding it too costly to have it picked up. 
It cost $1 18.53 per ton to dispose of trash and $00.00 to recycle. In other 
words, we covered the recycling cost and on top of that we made $2358.55 
or we got paid $21 . 10 a ton to recycle. Also the bag sales income and 
other fees totaled $18720.20. Cost to run the waste program was 
19585.02. A loss of $864.82, which shows a price per bag is just about 



75 



right. The town is not in the money making business, just trying to cover 

our cost. So if you are not recycling I wonder why. If you cut down on 

your waste, your cost for bags will go down for the year. 

On the recycling side of things, it shows a drop from 2006 for a total 

1 1 1 .73 tons of recycled items. This does not include weights added to the 

compost pile. Some of the difference may be when loads went out. Last 

year's totals were 128.83, and breaks down as follows: for 06 

GLASS 15.52 tons 

PAPER 60.09 

PLASTIC 9.24 

STEEL 25.52 

OTHER METALS— ALUMINUM CANS, ETC. 1 .36 TONS 

This is a 47 % ratio of trash to recycling, which is a figure the town's 
people should he proud of. Thank you for doing such a good job! This 
puts us above many NH towns. According to state figures released for 
2006, the state avg. is only 20.6%. We are only one of a handful of towns 

to recycle this much. You can view this report @ www.des.nh. 
gov/SWTAS/pdf/rec mun.pdf 

The per capita expense to dispose of solid waste in NH is approximately is 
$77.00, so figure that out in Piermont it works out to a little over 56 
thousand dollar budget. I believe we run a very cost effective operation 
even though I had many of you come in and say I'm ripping you off. 
There were two different days when the compactor was full and I had to 
have a truck come to take the trash for those two days. The charge was 
$680.00 for 2.72 tons of trash. That works out to $250.00 a ton or a little 
over $4.00 a bag. 

There are many people who help keep recycling working in Piermont from 
the employee's to the town's people themselves. There is one who I would 
like to mention in this report who does a lot for little or no pay that is 
Chris Davidson. For example, he keeps our dumpsters all knocked down 
so we don't have to move the containers so often, thus allowing us to get 
more weight per load thus saving on costs. One example of this was the 
weekend after Christmas. In that two day period the 30 yard dumpster was 
running over. If he had not flattened it down, it would have had to been 
shipped out, but we were able to get another week.in it. By doing this we 
were able to get a check versus paying for trucking. In other words, the 



76 



load paid for itself and we made money. He also keeps the glass flattened 
so we are able to ship 15.52 tons on one load. If we didn't have it 
flattened, the bunker would be full and need to be shipped out at least 3 
times a year. He also didn't charge for the hour loading the glass. I can 
remember when we had the open top containers for trash. Every time it 
needed to be flattened it cost $30.00 each time. I used to budget $900.00 
just for that purpose. For the whole year, Chris charged a total of $70.00. 
He could very well charge every time for it but he chooses not to. There 
are many other items he does to help out. 
Sincerely, 
Wayne F. Godfrey 
Recycling Manager 
Town of Piermont 

2008 TRANSFER & RECYCLE BUDGET 

Normandeau Trucking 15,457.00 

Salary 10,983.00 

FICA 853.00 

Training 320.00 

Electric 285.00 

Recycle Hauler 1000.00 

Plastic Bags for recycling 130.00 

State Recertification 1 00.00 

Light Bulb Recycling 220.00 

Paint Recycling 500.00 

Metal Removal and rental 1 1 00.00 

Tire removal 875.00 

HazMatDay 1460.00 

Bags and Labels for PAYT 4600.00 

Maintenance on Compactor 550.00 

Propane for Heating Office 75.00 

NRRA Dues 50.00 

Computer / Upgrade 550.00 

Electronics Recycling 800.00 

Total 39,908.00 

Income from Sale of Bags and other fees-estimate -19500.00 

Total Tax Money Needed 20,408.00 



77 



ANNUAL REPORT - 2007 

Upper Valley River Subcommittee 

of the Connecticut River Joint Commissions 

This year the Upper Valley Subcommittee completed a new and expanded water 

resources chapter of the Connecticut River Management Plan, focusing on the 

many environmental and economic benefits of keeping floodplains free of 

development and vegetated riparian buffers along riverbanks to keep them stable, 

block debris, shade the water, and filter pollutants from runoff. 

The Subcommittee provides information and assistance to the states, towns, and 

landowners on projects near the river. We encourage towns to consider our Plan 

and to incoiporate its recommendations when updating town plans and revising 

zoning ordinances. We urge all anglers and boaters to clean their gear carefully to 

avoid spreading Didymo, the newly discovered invasive alga in the Connecticut 

River. 

Citizens who wish to represent the town should contact the selectmen. The 

Subcommittee is advisory and has no regulatory authority. The public is welcome 

at our meetings on the third Monday evening of every other month at the 

Thetford Bicentennial Building. A calendar, more about Didymo, advice on bank 

erosion and obtaining permits for work near the river, the Connecticut River 

Management Plan and much more are on the web at www.cric.oit. 

Charles Grant and Hal Covert, Piermont representatives to the Upper Valley 

Subcommittee 

CONNECTICUT RIVER JOINT COMMISSIONS 

This year the Connecticut River Joint Commissions (CRJC) issued a new 
Riverwide Overview for water resources in the watershed. Look for a 
presentation in your area in 2008. We cooperated with Vermont and New 
Hampshire agencies in responding to the discovery of Didymo in the river, and 
hosted Governor Jim Douglas for Vermont's Clean and Clear Water Action Day. 
We also helped guide the new conservation plan for the Conte Refuge, 
supporting the public's original vision. 

In 2007 CRJC considered issues as wide-ranging as the operation of hydro dams 
on the Connecticut River, silver maple floodplain forest health, mercury 
emissions, and Important Bird Areas. 

CRJC supports efforts to safeguard the valley's natural, agricultural, and historic 
assets, and is working with businesses and the states to strengthen the local base 
for tourism through the Connecticut River Byway. In 2007 we worked with 
Wells River, Woodsville, and other towns on a signage plan for the Byway. Look 
for new signs in 2008. Visit the Byway at www.ctrivertravel.net. 



78 



Appointed by the legislatures of New Hampshire and Vermont to guide growth 

and development in the watershed, the CRJC are advisory and have no regulatory 

powers, preferring instead to ensure greater public involvement in decisions that 

affect the river region. We welcome the public to our meetings on the last 

Monday of every other month. Visit our web site for a calendar of events, useful 

information and links, and our newsletters, River Valley News and River Byway 

News. 

Robert Ritchie, Connecticut River Commissioner 

for an electronic copy of this report, please contact 

Adair Mulligan at 603-795-2104 or adair. rnulligan(2lcr/c. org. 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the TRUSTEES of TRUST FUNDS 2007 

Lou Hobbs retired as a Trustee of Trust Funds and Cemeteries in 
September of 2007. We will miss Lou. He had been a Trustee of Trust 
Funds, Cemeteries and Sexton since 1983 and did a great job. This past 
summer he had a chance to sell his house in Piermont and move to 
Woodsville to a more modest retirement home. We will miss him. Thank 
you Lou! 

The Selectmen appointed Abby Metcalf to fill out Lou's term as Trustee 
of Trust Funds and Cemeteries. Welcome Abby! 

As the financial markets "softened" this past year, the fund's income and 
capital appreciation were a bit behind the performance of 2006. Piermont 
funds are invested in low risk, and therefore, lower yield investments 
earning what is reasonable income given current market conditions. 
Our investment objective has been, and remains, to maximize income 
from investments that pose little or no risk to principal. 
Respectfully Submitted, 
Frederick W. Shipman, 
Bookkeeping Trustee 



79 



ANNUAL REPORT of the CEMETERY TRUSTEES 2007 

Lou Hobbs retired as Sexton of the Piermont Cemeteries in September of 2007. 

He had been a Trustee of Trust Funds, Cemeteries and Sexton since 1983 and did 

a great job. This past summer he had a chance to sell his house in Piermont and 

move to Woodsville to a more modest retirement home. We will miss him. 

Thank you Lou! 

Trustee of Trust Funds and Cemeteries Jean Underhill took on the Sexton's 

responsibilities when Lou left and has already showed that she will be up to the 

job. 

The work at the new section of South Lawn Cemetery continued. This coming 

year we hope to start on the fence and roadway as funds permit. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Frederick W. Shipman, 

Bookkeeping Trustee 

TOWN RECREATIONAL FACILITIES EXPENDAL TRUST FUND 

For Recreational Facility- Cash Equivalent 
December 31, 2007 
Beginning Balance, 1/1/2007 

Shares Purchased 5,000.00 

Ending Balance, 12/3 1/2007 5,000.00 

TOWN EQUIPMENT CAPITAL RESERVE FUND 

For Vehicular Equipment - Cash Equivalent Fund 
December 3 1,2007 . 

Beginning Balance, 1/1/07 16,171.34 

Shares Purchased 5,000.00 

Dividend Income/Money Market Fund 709.18 

Ending Balance, 12/31/07 21,880.52 

TOWN FIRE/EMERGENCY SERVICES VEHICLES CAPITAL 

RESERVE FUND 

For Fire and Emergency Service Vehicles-Cash Equivalent Fund 

December 31, 2007 

Beginning Balance, 1/1/07 14,457.71 

Shares Purchased 1 0,000.00 

Income Earned 637.01 

Ending Balance, 12/31/07 ' 25,094.72 



80 



TOWN REVALUATION CAPITAL RESERVE FUND 

For Revaluation of Town Properties - Cash Equivalent Fund 

December 31, 2007 

Beginning Balance 1/1/07 4,148.59 

Income Earned 184.58 

Shares Purchased 5,000.00 

Ending Balance, 12/31/07 9,333.17 

TOWN BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS CAPITAL RESERVE FUND 

For Capital Improvements - Cash Equivalent Fund 
December 31, 2007 

Beginning Balance, 1/1/07 31,811.28 

Income Earned 1,415.41 

Ending Balance 12/3 1/07 33.226.69 

TOWN BEAN BROOK BRIDGE EXPENDABLE TRUST 

For the Repair and Maintenance of Bean Brook Bridge - Cash Equivalent Fund 

December 31, 2007 



Beginning Balance, 1/1/07 145,492.88 

Shares Purchased 

Shares Sold 149,786.39 

Income Earned 4.293.51 

Ending Balance, 12/31/07 
TOWN BRIDGES EXPENDABLE TRUST 
For the Repair and Maintenance of Town Bridges - Cash Equivalent Fund 

December 3 1,2007 

Beginning Balance 1/1/07 41,361.25 

Shares Purchased 5,000.00 

Income Earned 1,840.33 

Ending Balance 12/31/07 48,201.58 



81 



TOWN RECYCLING/TRANSFER EXPENDABLE TRUST FUND 

December 31, 2007 

Beginning Balance, 1/1/07 4,83 1 .09 

Shares Purchased - See Note 3,000 

Income Earned 212.87 

Ending Balance 12/3 1/07 8,043.96 

Note: Funds deposited to this account were credited in 2006. The amount cannot 
be determined until the end of year, as it comes from the annual recycling 
income. 

TOWN BEDFORD LOT EXPENDABLE TRUST FUND 

December 31, 2007 

Beginning Balance, 1/1/07 4,303.18 

Income Earned 

Ending Balance 12/3 1/07 4,49 1 .90 

HERBERT A. CLARK MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 
For the Support of the Town 
31-Dec-07 
Year Capital Dividend Year End 

Beginning 
Market Gain Income Market Value 

Name of Investment Value Reinvested 

American Balanced Fund 356,777.50 8,253.53 9,754.16 370,394.63 

Capital World Growth & 141,115.71 11,237.43 3,870.34 161,726.06 

Income Fund 

Growth Fund of America 134,393.40 8,410.32 1,469.05 147,615.81 

Washington Mutal 209,754.78 11,673.10 4,272.11 213,899.85 

Investors Fund 

842,041.39 39,574.38 19,365.66 893,636.35 



82 



CEMETERY TRUST FUND 
for the support of the cemeteries December 31, 2007 



Year Capital Dividend Year End 



Name of Investment 

Growth Fund of America 
Washington Mutual Fund 
American Balanced Fund 



Beginning Gain Income 
Market Reinvested 
Value 

29,004.13 1,815.07 317.04 
45,268.25 2,519.23 921.98 
76,998.00 1,781.24 2,105.10 



Market 
Value 

31,857.71 
46,162.82 
79,936.80 



Capital World Growth 



30,454.89 2,425.20 835.28 34,902.86 



TOTAL 



181,725.27 8,540.74 4,179.40 192,860.19 



Cemetery Payments 

Asa Metcalf 

Bank of America 

Jean Underhill 

Local Government Center 

Louis Hobbs 

Oakes Brothers 

Piermont Plant Pantry 

The Shipman Company 

Twin State Fertilizer 

USPS 



Cemetery Receipts 

Alex Medlicott & Kristi Medill 
DIV American Funds 
Elizabeth O McCoy 
Hale Funeral Home 
Interest Earned 
Piermont Plant Pantry 
Ricker Funeral Home 
Thomas & Barbara Stevens 



-288.00 

-50.00 
-275.00 

-22.00 
-225.00 

-25.70 

-10,204.2 

-715.00 

-211.20 

-26.00 
12,042.18 



525.00 

4,674.87 

50.00 

400.00 

18.30 

87.00 

325.00 

750.00 

6,830.17 



83 



Cemetery Trustees 
Reconciliation for Year Ending 1 2/3 1 /07 

Beginning Cash Balance as of 

Receipts 

Disbursements 
Ending Cash Balance as of 

Bank Statement Balance as of 
Checking. WGSB #2310401 5 

Deposits Outstanding as of 
Checks Outstanding as of 
Reconciled Balance 



1/1/07 
12/31/07 


$12,935.71 
$6,830.17 
($12,042.18) 
$7,723.70 


12/31/07 


$6,408.50 


12/31/07 
12/31/07 


$1,315.20 
$0.00 



$7,723.70 



Vital records for 2008 



BIRTH 

Name 



Date 



Father 



Mother 



Blowey, Aiden Michael 


02-15-2007 


Chris 




Valerie 


Root, Peter Louis 


04-10-2007 


Chris 


and 


Beata 


Rich, Evan Jonathan 


05-06-2007 


Arron 


and 


Patience 


St, Laurence, Ethan Michael 


05-17-2007 


Michael 


and 


Jennifer 


Wagstaff, Eliza Kelly 


06-17-2007 


Erik 


and 


Rebecca 


Sargent, Kylee Emily 


07-22-2007 


Samantha 






Betz, Kylee Angelina 


07-27-2007 


William 


and 


Susan 


Miller, Ryan Prescott 


09-04-2007 


Sean 


and 


Kim 


Rodimon, Jonathan Aaron 


09-19-2007 


Chris 


and 


Crystal 


Hogan, Nathan Thomas 


09-28-2007 


Matthew 


and 


Joanne 


DEATHS 










Name 


Date of Death 




Place of Death 


Labay, Beulah 


02-18-2007 




Piermont, NH 


Nelson, Deborah 


02-19-2007 




Piermont, NH 


Oakes. Lottie 


03-19-2007 




Whi Ri Junc,Vt 


Hartley, Ernest 


04-11-2007 




N.Haverhill,NH 


MARRIAGE 










Groom's Name Residence 


Bride's Name Residence Date 



Brown, Kevin 
Godfrey, Wayne 
Sales, Eric F 
Eastman, Justin 
Robie, Mark 
Hynes, George 



Piermont, NH 
Piermont, NH 
Florence,ma 
Bradford, Vt 
Piermont, NH 
Piermont, NH 



Parker, Malinda 
Martin, Linda 
Medlicott, Emilia 
Scott, Jaimie 
Miller, Elaina 
Hathaway, Wendy 



Piermont, NH 
Piermont, NH 
Piermont,, NH 
Bradford, Vt 
Orford, NH 
Piermont, NH 



02-10-2007 
06-02-2007 
08-18-2007 
09-02-2007 
09-15-2007 
10-20-2007 



84 



REQUESTS 



FOR 



PARTICIPATION 



AND 



DONATION 



85 



The Lower Cohase Regional Chamber of Commerce 

Serving the towns of Haverhill and Piermont, NH 
and Bradford and Newbury, VT 



Our Mission: The Lower Cohase Regional Chamber of Commerce is committed to 
fostering a vibrant economic climate by encouraging cooperation and communication 
among the region's communities, while ensuring a high quality of life. 

Now entering its seventh year, the Chamber has seen its membership (businesses, non- 
profits & individuals) grow to 163. As we grow, we are working to be pro-active to the 
changes in the regional retail and travel & tourism climate, while keeping our mission in 
the forefront. Some of our projects and goals: 

• We continue to lead the effort to educate local businesses on how to prepare for, 
and maximize, their opportunities in relation to the expected significant increase in 
retail traffic that will accompany the new Wal-Mart opening 

• We help advertise businesses throughout the year in a number of ways. . . . 

A free listing and locator placement on our annual full color Area Guide 
and Map for business memberships. Due to its popularity, we are 
increasing the number of copies to be produced for 2008 and will be 
distributing them to local businesses in both New Hampshire and 
Vermont, as well as rest areas and welcome centers in both states. 

A free listing and web page, or link to a-web site, on the Business 
Directory of our website, www.cohase.org ., our primary source for 
marketing the area. Our web site was dramatically upgraded this year. 

Representation, through our participation, on the Regional Marketing 
Program for the Eastern VT area and through state tourism websites. 

• Networking through Chamber-sponsored events, including Business After Hours. 

• Sponsoring, or co-sponsoring, The Whole Hog Music & BBQ Festival, Paddle 
the Border, The Alumni Hall Photography Contest, and Farmer's Markets to 
attract tourism to our area. 

• Reporting on important business issues and events in our newsletter, The Cohase 
Connection, and through timely e-mail communications directly to our members. 



86 



• Offering access to affordable group health and dental care for businesses in either 
Vermont or New Hampshire. This year we joined the New Hampshire Association 
of Chamber of Commerce Executives which allows us to become 

a gateway to health insurance in New Hampshire. Our partnership with the 
Vermont Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives has allowed us to 
offer health care to Vermont businesses; 1 1 1 Vermont residents are currently 
participating in these plans. 

• The Web Site and the Map/Brochure are valuable resources for residents as well 
as visitors, with information on town governments, schools, and area businesses, 
as well as a community calendar and links to many sites with pertinent 
information. 

• Fostering communication between the town governments, merchants associations, 
economic development organizations and non-profits in the region to maximize 
the resources and minimize conflicts. This includes scheduling several joint 
meetings throughout the year and keeping representation on a number of boards 
and committees to keep information flowing throughout. 

We hope you will continue to support the Lower Cohase Regional Chamber of 
Commerce and that you will communicate your thoughts, wishes and concerns to us. 
Our contact information is: 

The Lower Cohase Regional Chamber of Commerce 

P.O. Box 35 

5 1 Main Street 

Wells River, VT 05081-0035 

Phone - (802)- 757-2549 
Email address - jnjowell@sover.net (Judy Jowell, Executive Director) 



87 



Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice of VT and NH 
Home Healthcare, Hospice and Maternal Child Health Services in the Town of 

Piermont 

The VNA & Hospice is a not-for-profit organization providing home healthcare, hospice, 
and maternal child health services for over 100 years. Recognizing the importance of 
caring for people in the comfort of their home, our services are provided to all in need, 
regardless of ability to pay. Last year, the VNA & Hospice provided over 1.9 million 
dollars in uncompensated care to individuals. The VNA & Hospice, like the local EMS, 
police and fire departments, is a vital part of the community's safety net. Town funding is 
only intended to be a "contribution" towards the full cost of services provided to 
residents. 

Supporting home healthcare is a way to control other town expenses. By keeping 
Piermont residents out of emergency rooms and hospitals and by reducing the need for 
relocation to nursing homes, our care offers significant savings in the town's emergency 
services and other medical costs. VNA & Hospice nurses provide health education, 
local clinics, and comprehensive compassionate care, from before birth through the end 
of life. 

Services provided between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007: 

Home HealthcareMaternal and Child Health Services 

Residents Served: 17 Residents Served: 2 

Home Visits: 505 Home Visits: 10 

Hours of Service: 419.93 Hours of Service: 7.08 

Hospice ServicesLong Term Care 

Residents Served: Residents Served: 2 

Home Visits: Home Visits: • 93 

Hours of Service: Hours of Service: 1 1 7.27 

Additionally, residents made visits to VNA community clinics for foot care, blood 
pressure screenings, cholesterol testing and flu shots. 

On behalf of the people we serve in your community, thank you for your continued 
support. 




Mark Hamilton 

Interim President and CEO 



88 



UPPER VALLEY LAKE SUNAPEE REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 

ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2007 

Through UVLSRPC membership, the 27 cities and towns of the Upper Valley, Sullivan 
County and Lake Sunapee area strive to ensure that the growth of the Region does not 
lower our quality of life, and that it enhances rather than threatens our healthy economy. 
Regional planning provides a mechanism for communities that live and work together to 
collaborate on issues of common concern, such as transportation, emergency preparedness, 
economic development, housing and resource protection. Your community's active 
participation in UVLSRPC provides you with a voice in regional activities, as well as in 
decision-making at the state level that affects the future of your community. 
Here is a summary of our work during the past year: 

• Completed Phase I of the Route 120 Corridor Management Plan in Hanover and Lebanon, 
and began transit plans with Community Transportation Services in Sullivan County and 
Advance Transit in Grafton County. 

• Continued to participate and facilitate the Comprehensive Economic Development 
Strategy (CEDS) developed for Sullivan County to increase eligibility for federal funding 
for economic development and infrastructure improvements. 

• Continued to collaborate with economic development partners in Grafton County through 
the North Country CEDS Committee. 

• Partnered with Lake Sunapee Protective Association and Sunapee Area Watershed 
Coalition to help communities collaborate on watershed management planning. 

• Completed the Route 4 Corridor Management Plan to balance growth of Canaan and 
Enfield village centers with needs of commuters. 

• Obtained funding for Source Water Protection inventories, planning and outreach for 
Claremont and Croydon. 

• Promoted our Region's priorities for federal and state transportation funding including 
Transportation Enhancement (TE) Grants. Served on NH Congestion Mitigation & Air 
Quality Advisory Committee (CMAQ). 

• Participated in work group studying sprawl in NH and effectiveness of state smart growth 
policies with NH Association of Regional Planning Commission's Legislative Policy 
Committee, NH GIS Advisory Committee, and Mount Sunapee Ski Area Advisory 
Committee. 

• Co-wrote innovative zoning guidebook with NHDES and NHARPC. 

• Began updating the Land Use Chapter of the Regional Plan. 

• Participated in the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning's fall conference. 

• Assisted Connecticut River Joint Commissions with update of corridor management plan. 

• Participated in Sullivan County Community Mobility Project to begin identi'ing and 
addressing unmet transportation needs. 

• Performed over 100 traffic counts in 13 communities throughout the Region to provide 
data for state and regional transportation plans. 

• Continued to participate with Advance Transit, Community Transportation Services, 
Upper Valley Transportation Management Association, Connecticut River Joint 
Commissions, Connecticut River 

• Byway Council, Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee, Upper 
Valley Housing Coalition, North Country Resource Conservation & Development, and 
Lake Sunapee Protective Association. 



89 



• Organized 4 hazardous waste collections in which over 1 , 1 00 households participated 
to keep approximately 1 1,000 gallons of hazardous chemicals out of the Region's 
groundwater. 

• Organized, facilitated and participated in a panel thscussion for local officials 
regarding solid waste disposal issues in Sullivan County. 

• Assisted 7 communities with updates of local master plans, 2 with zoning 
amendments, 1 with a Natural Resource Inventory, 1 with starting a capital 
improvement program and 3 with other regulations. 

• Completed road inventories in 5 member communities and processed inventories in 
an additional 3 communities, ensuring that full state aid for maintenance is received. 

• Conducted hazard mitigation planning in 6 communities to enable them to be eligible 
for federal disaster assistance and hazard mitigation funds. Assisted 2 communities 
with review of National Flood Insurance Program compliance. Assisted Sullivan 
County communities with process to adopt new floodplain maps to ensure residents! 
continued eligibility for flood insurance. 

• Assisted communities with review of proposed developments. 

• Published Elevate the Creative Economy: a planning guide for communities 
interested in enhancing their "creative economy" as an economic development tool. 

• Continued emphasis on informational programs and training for local officials 
including Law Lecture Series and programs including: People Power: How to get 
Citizens to Turn Out, Tune in, and Stay Tuned, How to Combat Sprawl with Simple 
Zoning Techniques, and Context Sensitive Solutions: What This New Approach to 
Transportation Planning Means For Your Community. 

• Began the CSS (Context Sensitive Solutions) Process with Charlestown and Walpole 
for Route 12. 

• Responded to numerous dayto-day requests from local board members and staff for 
guidance, data and 015 maps. 

• Continued to update our website www.uvlsrpc.org — with information on planning 
issues and events, and kept library current with the latest technical guidance, planning 
literature, and sample regulations. Provided information to businesses, residents, 
libraries, school districts and other area organizations. 

• Participated in professional development activities to ensure planning staff stays up- 
to-date on best practices, emerging topics, 015, and changes in NH land use law and 
federal funding programs of benefit to communities. 

Each year we try to address the highest priority needs of the Region, while balancing 
the varied concerns of both the larger and smaller communities within our area. 
We appreciate the high level of participation and support we receive from our 
communities, and look forward to continuing to serve the needs of the Region in 
addressing the issues above and others that arise in the future. We count on feedback 
from the Commissioners appointed by each community, as well as local officials and 
residents, to ensure that our work program continues to focus on those regional issues 
that are of the highest priority to you. 

Please feel free to contact us at (603) 448-1680 or email me at cwalkerc@uvlsrpc.org 
to share your thoughts. 
Christine Walker 
Executive Director 



90 



Raymond S. Burton I 

338 River Road 

Bath, NH 03740 

Tel. (603) 747-3662 

Car Phone: (603)481-0863 December 27, 2007 

E-mail: ray.bunon4@gte.net 

Report to the People of District One 

By 

Ray Burton, Councilor District One 

It is a pleasure to serve this large northern district of 98 towns, 4 cities, and 5 counties 

with a population of 247,000 people. The Executive Council is at the top of your 

Executive Branch of NH State Government. The Governor and Executive Council 

appoint 352 Commissions and Directors who administer NH law and budget as 

prescribed by the NH House and Senate. 

2008 is the year to keep an eye on and follow the progress of the NH Transportation Plan. 

The recommended projects in the highway and bridge plan can be accomplished with 

existing revenue from the state gasoline tax, bonds and matching federal funds. The 

Executive Council held public hearings on the projects throughout the state and 

forwarded their recommendations to Governor Lynch. Governor Lynch will review our 

recommendations and then submit his recommended plan to the NH House and Senate by 

January 15th, 2008. Without any new revenues for additional projects we will be lucky to 

maintain the existing state highway and bridge system. If more work is desired than new 

revenues will have to be voted by the Members of the House and Senate and signed by 

the Governor. Contact your local legislators- House and Senate. Find them by going to 

wtw.nh.gov 

This large northern district needs more people on state mandated volunteer boards and 

commissions. Send your letter of interest and resume to my office, or to Kathy Goode, 

Director of 

Appointments/Liaison to the Council, Governor's Office, State House, 107 North Main 

Street, Concord, NH 03301. Tel. (603) 271-2121. To find out what openings are available 

and to see a list of boards, visit the NH Secretary of State website at 

www.sos.nh.gov/redbook/index/htm. 

I have available from my office informational items about the NH Executive Council, NH 

Constitution, NH Tourist Map, 2007 Consumer Handbook, and District Maps. IF you 

would like to receive my Monday morning report by e-mail please send an e-mail address 

to rburton' a), nh.gov. 

It is an honor to continue to serve you in my now 30 years as a public servant. Contact 

my office anytime about your ideas, concerns and problems with state government. I 

respond to all inquiries and challenges. 

COOS COUNTY: 

Berlin, Carroll. Clarkaville Colebrook. Columbia. Dalton, 

Dixville, Drummer. Errol, Gorharn, Jefferson. Lancaster, 

Milan. Millafield, Northumberland. Pinsburg. Randolph, Shelburne, 

Stewartsiown, Stark. Straford. Whitefield 



91 



COTTAGE HOSPITAL 

90 Swiftwater Road, P.O. Box 2001, Woodsvil]e, New Hampshire 037X5-2001 

603-747-9000 • FAX 603-747-3310 

December 20, 2007 

Board of Selectmen 

Town of Piermont 

Piermont, NH 03779 

Dear Members of the Board of Selectpersons: 

It has been another very exciting year at Cottage Hospital. Over the last year we have 

seen growth in many areas of the hospital. As many of you know, we are reaching 

completion of a very exciting building project, which should be complete as of the first of 

the year. This building project will make space for expansion of growing clinical services 

such as Pain Management, Day Surgery, Radiology and Laboratory. 

Financially, Fiscal Year 2006-2007 closed with a negative bottom line from operations. 

The hospital has had to increase support for Charity Care and the uninsured, as well as 

having our orthopedic surgeon called to active duty in the Navy for nine months. 

Nonetheless, our 

orthopedic surgeon is back to Collage and functioning for the community. We have 

continued to enhance our clinical technical capabilities with a new 16-slice CT and a 

brand new orthopedic and general x-ray room. We have also continued to make strides 

toward a full electronic health record and we will be going live the first week in January 

on a complete electronic Emergency Room Record, which should help move people 

through our ER more quickly, and have a complete electronic record of the visit. 

At Collage Hospital we are all very proud of the personal care that we are able to give to 

our patients. Time and time again, we hear about the outstanding care that patients and 

family members have received while with us. 

We know our communities are supportive of our institution, and we are extremely 

grateful for the financial support that our area towns have provided over the years. 

Although funds are always needed and welcomed at Collage Hospital, we know there are 

many worthy organizations also asking for money this year. Despite our negative bottom 

line this year, the Collage Hospital Board of Trustees has decided NOT to ask the towns 

for financial support for the fourteenth consecutive year. 

We thank you for your continued support and pledge to continue to do our best to provide 

you and your families with the highest quality of healthcare possible. 

We will appreciate your including this message in your 2007 Annual Report, and we will 

forward our 2007 Annual Report to you as soon as it is available. Best wishes for a health 

new year. 

SizCerely 

Administrator 

"A Critical Access Hospital" 



92 



UNH Cooperative Extension - Grafton County 
Annual Report, 2007 

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, Grafion County, has been serving 
the people of our county in the following ways: 

The Nutrition Connections program, coordinated by Robin Peters, reached over 1 00 
families in their adult programs and 200 children in their youth programs. The children 
were from various Head Start programs; local elementary schools; Whole Village Family 
Resource Center's Child Care Center; the 2V1 Century After School Program; North 
Country Academy Charter School and the Circle Program's summer camp. 
The Family and Consumer Resources program Educator, Deb Maes, has worked with a 
new collaboration in Plymouth that allowed limited resource families to participate in a 
five- week Making Money Work for You program. In addition, over 400 food sen 'ice 
workers participated in either a two-day food safety class or an intensive one day class as 
part of the Family and Consumer Resources program. Of those attending, over 83% 
scored 75% or higher on the National Restaurant Association's exam and were certified 
for five years based on their food safety knowledge. Deb also taught participants in the 
Grafion County Academy Program nutrition and food budgeting tips, money 
management, parent education and people-skills as part of their education prior to 
graduating from the program. 

Nutrient management in the production of forages, vegetables and fruits continues to be a 
major focus of the Agricultural Resources program. Nutrient Management Plans on more 
than 4000 acres of corn and forages were reviewed and updated by Tom Buob, Extension 
Educator. Through the use of the IJNHCE Soil Testing Program farmers were 
encouraged to maximize the utilization of their on-farm resources to minimize costs and 
improve profits. Forty producers submitted 1 60 samples in this process. 
Agricultural Resources programs continued to expand efforts with vegetable farmers to 
incorporate more environmentally sound management practices into their overall 
management schemes, including: drip inigation, individual row fertigation, and the 
introduction of disease resistant varieties to reduce pesticide use. The use of floating row 
covers was promoted and demonstrated to reduce the use of insecticides and encourage 
earlier production of various vegetable crops. The vegetable produce from the 
demonstration plots (several tons of tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, etc) was donated to 
various Senior Centers in the Upper Valley. 

The 4-H Youth Development program has over 300 members and 1 10 leaders supporting 
23 traditional clubs. Volunteers in the 4-H program provided over 4,000 hours of service 
in 2006-2007 to support the educational objectives of the program. A 4-H Afterschool 
group was formed in Littleton. In addition, Kathy Jablonski, 4-H Youth Development 
Educator, has provided assistance to four community's and their after school programs. 
One program in Littleton, Project REACH, received a JC Penney 4-H Aftershool Grant. 
Consultation for grants has been done with several other programs. Statewide training in 
positive youth development theory has been presented at Plustime, 21 Century and 
Extension sponsored conferences. 

This year the Master Gardener and the 4-H horticulture programs have been supported by 
a program associate. The approximately 25 MG's have given hundreds of hours of 



93 



support to the Grafion County communities. Their showpiece project, the perennial 

gardens at the county complex, has been coordinating with the County Commissioners. In 

addition, Dana Karuza Tulp, Volunteer Management Coordinator, coordinated the 4-H 

summer gardening program for 60 youth and their leaders. A series of 10 workshops, 

open to 4-Hers and the general public, were held on a variety of horticultural topics 

throughout the spring and summer months. 

Michal Lunak, Extension Dairy Specialist, has also been working with local dairy 

producers on herd management, farm transfer planning, and quality milk production. He 

also facilitated with a series of biosecurity workshops that were co-sponsored by UNH 

Cooperative Extension and the New Hampshire State Veterinarian. In all, 77 agricultural 

professionals and 72 producers, youth, and general public participated. 

Northam Parr, Forestry Resources Educator, spent considerable time assessing the 

damage from the spring storms and connecting wood lot owners with the correct agencies 

and providers. The Tree Farm program continues to be supported, including the New 

Hampshire Tree Farm Field Day. In addition, Northam has worked on sustainable 

forestry plans with landowners and has facilitated with certified logging professional 

workshops. 

Northam Parr and Michal Lunak serve on the county farm committee to help to develop a 

sustainability plan for the county farmlands, woodlands, and dairy herd. Deb Maes, Nory 

Parr and Robin Peters have assisted the communities of Landaff, Rumney and Canaan in 

their Community Profile work and follow up activities. 

UNHCE continues to provide New Hampshire's citizens with research based education, 

information and technical assistance, enhancing their abilities to make informed decisions 

strengthening youth, families and communities while sustaining natural resources and 

improving the economy. Funded through the federal, state and county government and 

competitive grants, educational programs are designed to respond to the local needs of 

citizens through direction and support of the elected volunteer Extension Advisory 

Council. 

For information, please contact our office Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

by calling: 

603-787-6944 or emailing: ggfton(?iceunh.unh.edu. You will find current information on 

our website: 

www.extension.unh.edu 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen E. Jablonski, Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, and County Office 

Administrator 



94 



White Mountain Mental Health and Common Ground 
Director's Report -2007 Town of Piermont 

As you sit on those folding chairs or bleachers at town meeting and listen to the warrant articles being 
discussed, you may wonder how the money you appropriate to White Mountain Mental 
Health/Common Ground is used in your town. This report is one means of informing you, the 
taxpayer, about what is done with this funding. 

First, in general terms: the impact of your support is seen in children who become more successful in 
school and better prepared for adulthood, in adults who resume functioning as employees and parents, 
in elders who are able to stay independent and productive and in families with a developmentally 
disabled member who are able to move forward with their own lives, knowing that there is support 
outside of the family circle for their loved one. People who receive life-saving medical services are 
eager to tell their friends and family about the success of their care. You have seen "cards of thanks" 
in the local papers, naming the physicians, nurses, family and friends who came to the aid of a grateful 
patient. These thanks are well deserved! But., .have you ever seen a similar tribute to mental health, 
substance abuse or developmental disability professionals who saved a life by being available to 
intervene in a life-threatening crisis of a different type? Chances are that your family member or 
neighbor will not advertise the fact that they have needed and used our services; life's challenges are 
often kept private. Having diabetes is much more acceptable than having schizophrenia, although both 
are chronic illnesses that can be managed through treatment, lifestyle education and support. We still 
struggle with the stigma attached to both behavioral health and developmental disability, but who 
among us has not been impacted by one or both? 

Support for our services is an investment in the health and productivity of your town. In the North 
Country, unlike many parts of the State and Country, services continue to be available to ALL 
residents, not just those who can pay or those with a severe, biologic mental illness. This is because 
our towns and other supporters have recognized that unaddressed mental health and developmental 
issues have a tremendous negative "ripple effect" on the family, the economy and the whole 
community. 
Although it is impossible to list all that we do, our core services include: 

• 24 hour crisis intervention and assessment service for menial healih emergencies 

• Individual, marriage and family counseling, offered by highly trained mental health professionals 
with a variety of specialties 

• Medication consultations to local physicians by Board certified psychiatrists 

• "Full-life" supports for persons with serious and persistent mental illness, including housing, 
vocational and case management services 

• Individualized home placements for more than fifty persons with developmental disabilities 

• Life-enriching jobs and social connections for people with mental illness and developmental 
disabilities 

• Substance abuse prevention and treatment by our staff of licensed alcohol and drug abuse counselors 
Service Statistics Highlights: 

• In 2007, 8 residents of the town of Piermont received 20 hours of 
outpatient mental health or substance abuse treatment services at a 
discounted rate. Our ability to continue to offer these services on a 
sliding-fee scale is dependent upon the support of our communities. 

• 100 families in our area received extensive assistance in supporting a person with a developmental 
disability. In many cases, the supports include "full-life" around the clock services. 

Thank you for your continued support 
Respectfully submitted, Jane C. MackayjLW 
Area Director 



95 




P.O. Box 433 

Lebanon, NH 

03766-0433 

Phone: 603-448-4897 

Fax; 603-448-3906 

Website: www.gcscc.org 



Programs 

Bristol Area Senior Services 
(Bristol 744-8395) 
Horse Meadow Senior Center 
(N. Haverhill 787-2539) 

Linwood Area Senior Services 
(Lincoln 745-47°5) 

Littleton Area Senior Center 
(Littleton 444-6050) 

Mascoma Area Senior Center 
(Canaan 523-4333) 

Orford Area Senior Services 
(Orford 353-9107) 

Plymouth Regional Senior Center 
(Plymouth 536-1204) 

Upper Valley Senior Center 
(Lebanon 448-4213) 

RSVP & The Volunteer Center 
(Lebanon 448-1825) 



2007 Board of Directors 

Dick Jaeger, President 

Mike McKinney, Vice President 

Clark Griffiths, Treasurer 

Dr. Thomas S. Brown, Secretary 

Ralph Akins 

James D. "Pepper" Endexson 

BillCabler 

Annie LaBrecque 

Jenny Littlewood 

Cathie Meyer 

Tony Moehrke 

Pete Moseiey 

Lawrence E. Root 

Molly Scheu 

S. Arnold Shields 

Laurel Spielberg 

Frank Sbegler 

James Vamum 

Roberta Berner, Executive Director 



GRAFTON COUNTY SENIOR CITIZENS COUNCIL, ESC. 
ANNUAL REPORT 2007 

Grafton County Senior Citizens Council, Inc. is a private nonprofit organization that 
provides programs and services to support the health and well being of our older 
citizens. The Council's programs enable elderly individuals to remain independent in 
their own homes and communities for as long as possible. 

The Council operates eight senior centers in Plymouth, Littleton, Canaan, Lebanon, 
Bristol, Orford, Haverhill and Lincoln, sponsors the Grafton County ServiceLink 
Resource Center and the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program and Volunteer Center 
(RSVP) Through the centers, ServiceLink and RSVP, older adults and their families 
take part in a range of community-based long-term services including home delivered 
meals, congregate dining programs, transportation, adult day care, chore/home repair 
services, recreational and educational programs, and volunteer opportunities. 

During 2007, 55 older residents of Pierrnont were served by one or more of the 
Council's programs offered through the Orford and Horse Meadow Senior Centers: 

• Older adults from Pierrnont enjoyed 525 balanced meals in the company 
of friends in the senior dining rooms. 

• They received 1 ,3 1 9 hot. nourishing meals delivered to their homes by 
caring volunteers. 

• Pierrnont residents were transported to health care providers or other 
community resources on 23 occasions by our lift-equipped bus or 
volunteers. 

• They received assistance with problems, crises or issues of long-term care 
through 16 visits with a social worker. 

• Pierrnont *s citizens also volunteered to put their talents and skills to work 
for a better community through 756 hours of volunteer service. 

The cost to provide GCSCC services for- Pierrnont residents m 2007 was $12,141.08. 

Such services can be critical to elderly individuals who want to remain in their own 
homes and out of institutional care in spite of chronic health problems and increasing 
physical frailty, saving tax dollars that would otherwise be expended for nursing home 
care. They also contribute to a higher quality of life for our older friends and 
neighbors. As our population grows older, supportive services such as those offered 
by the Council become even more critical. 

Grafton County Senior Citizens Council very much appreciates Pierrnont 's support for 
our programs that enhance the independence and dignity of older citizens and enable 
them to meet the challenges of aging in the security and comfort of their own 
communities and homes. 



Roberta Berner, Executive Director 



A United Way Agency pre viding services to older adults in Grafton County 



96 



Grafton County Senior Citizens Council, Inc. 

Statistics for the Town of Piermont 
October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007 

During the fiscal year, GCSCC served 55 Piermont residents (out of 137 residents over 60, 2000 



Census). 














Services 

Congregate/Home 

Delivered 


Type of 
Service 

Meals 


Units of 
Service 

1,844 


X 
X 


Unit(l) 
Cost = 

$6.20 


$ 


Total Cost 
of Service 

11,432.80 


Transportation 


Trips 


23 


X 


$9.91 


$ 


227.93 


Adult Day Service 


Hours 





X 


$18.04 


$ 





Social Services 


Half- 
hours 


15.5 


X 


$30.99 


$ 


480.35 


Activities 




172 




N/A 







Number of Piermont volunteers 6_. Number of Volunteer Hours: 756 

GCSCC cost to provide services for Piermont residents only 
Request for Senior Services for 2007 
Received from Town of Piermont for 2007 
Request for Senior Services for 2008 

NOTE: 

1 . Unit cost from GCSCC Statement of Revenue and Expenses for October 1 , 2006 to 
September 30, 2007. 

2. Services were funded by Federal and State programs 56%; municipalities, county and United 
Way 1 1%; Contributions 8%; In-kind donations 16%; Friends of GCSCC 7%; Other 2%. 







$ 


12,141,0$ 


$ 


1,450 


$ 


1,450 


$ 


L300 



l:\Word Processing\TOWNS\Annual Town RequesttVTown stats by individual townVStatt for 2006-2007.doc 



97 



COMPARATIVE INFORMATION 

From Financial Statements for GCSCC 
Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007 

October 1 -September 30 



UNITS OF SERVICE PROVIDED 

Dining Room Meals 

Home Delivered Meals 

Transportation (Trips) 

Adult Day Service (Hours) 

Adult In Home Care 

Social Services (1/2 Hours) 

ServiceLink (including 
assistance with Medicare D) 



FY2006 


FY2007 


87,209 


82,616 


130,435 


133,140 


44,797 


46,143 


15,327 


11,393 


11,310 


15,483.25 


7,502.5 


3,376.5 


3,187 


5,383 



COST PER UNIT OF SERVICE PROVIDED 

Congregate/home delivered meals 

Transportation (per trip) 

Adult Day Service (hour of Service) 

Social Services (per unit) 

Adult In-Home Care (hour of service) 



FY2006 


FY2007 


$5.84 


$6.20 


$10.09 


$9.91 


$ 13.00 


$18.04 


$ 25.27 


$30.99 


$ 20.88 


$21.50 



98 



tffjher Valfeu IS TJouseholdTiazardous "Waste Committee 




c/o "Up/*? Va/Fey £*& SunafM 'Rqiontf'PUnnby Commicxm 
ya fi*»{ Strut Ltfmm, NH osy66^6 
6qy44&~*6&0 wtnu.uodlm.oro 



ANNUM, REPORT 2007 



The Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee is a volunteer organization whose 
purpose is to reduce harm to the environment and human health caused by the use and improper 
disposal of household hazardous waste. The Committee aims to: 

Educate the public to the dangers of hazardous waste. 

Encourage the use of less hazardous products in the home. 

Promote proper disposal of household hazardous waste. 

Support local agencies which reflect/promote our mission. 
During 2007 the Committee initiated a program to reduce the use of toxic products in lawn and 
garden care, hosted booths at the Upper Valley Home Life Exhibition and at the Mascoma 
Health Initiative, provided volunteers for household hazardous waste collections and continued 
to maintain a regional website. 

Toxicity Reduction Program would educate on environmentally safe lawn and garden care 
through an article in town newsletters or an insert in utility bills. Towns have been contacted and 
the information will go out winter and spring of 2008. A bookmark size summary of this 
information was distributed at collections. 

Event Booths The Household Hazardous Waste Committee's booth at the Upper Valley Home 
Life Exhibition again focused on non-toxic lawn and garden care and also supplied information 
on hazardous waste disposal and alternative cleaning recipes. 
The booth at the Mascoma Health Initiative in Canaan consisted of similar displays and 
information and gave us exposure in another area of the Upper Valley. 
Household Hazardous Waste Collection Support The committee provided volunteer support 
at the Lebanon collections, keeping waiting times short and residents informed. 
In New Hampshire 1 ,575 households brought 2,400Ibs. of waste to collections in Lebanon, 
Newport and Sunapee. In Vermont 1,115 households amtributed 10,055 gallons of waste. 
Collections were held in Hartford, Woodstock, Tfcetfbrd, Verehire, W. Fairlce, Bridgewatcr, 
Pomrjet, Norwich, Sharon and Strafford. 
Website www.qvfaJhw.org provides detailed information about: 

when and where this year's collections will be held and who may attend 

what you can and cannot bring 

less toxic recipes for cleaning solutions 

links to other regional authorities 
Funding A generous grant from the Dorothy Byrne Foundation is supporting our educational 
work. 

The Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee is made up of volunteers from Upper 
Valley towns. Wc invite anyone interested to attend our meetings and become involved. 



Margaret Bragg 
Jenny DeVost 
Charlotte Faulkner 
JoyGaine 
JohnHurd 



Hanover, NH 
UVLSRPC 
Hanover, NH 
Thetford,VT 
OUVSWD 



Joyce Noll 
LmPaxson 
Marjorie RogaJski 
Barbara Whitman, Chan- 



Etna, NH 
Hanover, NH 
Hanover, NH 
Lebanon, NH 



— *Rtduu Hie tot rfii&myovr(Kmu,^mfkmjity6fte — 



99 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

SCHOOL BOARD 

of the 

PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

for the 

FISCAL YEAR 

JULY 1, 2006 to JUNE 30, 2007 



100 



ORGANIZATION OF PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SCHOOL BOARD 



Vernon Jones - Chair 
Abigail Underhill 
Shawn Rogers 



CLERK 

Karen Fagnant 

TREASURER 

Frederick Shipman 



MODERATOR 

Arnold Shields 



Term Expires 2008 
Term Expires 2010 
Term Expires 2009 



HEALTH OFFICER 

Alex Medlicott 

AUDITORS 

Plodzik & Sanderson 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Bruce C. Labs 

2006-2007 STAFF 

Nancy Sandell - Principal 

Eileen Dohrman - Kindergarten 

Brenda Bianchi - Grades 1-2 

Cassandra Spaulding - Grades 3-4 

Jennifer Richards - Grades 5-6 

Lydia Hill - 7/8 
Nancy Sandell - 7/8 Science 

Paul Munn - Math 

Paula Poirier - Art Education 

Rebecca Bailey - Music 

Heather Odell - Special Education Teacher 

Kenneth Marier - Physical Education/Health Education 

Pam Hartley - Instructional Assistant 

Sanjuanita Jones - Instructional Assistant 

Billie Lamarre - Instructional Assistant 

Kimberly French - Guidance 

Moira Debois - School Psychologist 

Maren Boothby - Speech/Language Pathologist 

Margaret Ladd - Librarian 

Laurie Rippe - School Nurse 

Cindy Jackson - School Secretary 

Jim Raper - Custodian 

Linda Lea - Lunch Director 



101 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 

MARCH 20, 2007 

School District Clerk Karen Fagnant called the meeting to order at 7:30 pm. 
The first order of business was to elect a moderator to cover for Arnold 
Shields, who was unable to moderate due to illness. On motion by Fred 
Shipman and second by Helga Mueller, Joyce Tompkins was nominated 
Moderator Pro Tempore, all in favor. Joyce was administered her oath by 
Karen. 

Joyce began the meeting with the pledge of allegiance. She then introduced 
SAU 23 Superintendent Bruce Labs, School Board members Vernon Jones, 
Glen Meder, and Shawn Rogers along with Pat Amsden Financial Manager 
and Karen Fagnant School District Clerk. Ellen Putnam and Bill Daley were 
appointed to count if hand votes were needed. 

Fred Shipman made a motion to dispense reading the entire warrant. Second 
by Helga Mueller. All in favor. 

ARTICLE 1 : To hear reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees, or 
Officers chosen and pass any vote relating thereto. 

Moved by Abigail Metcalf Underhill, second by Helga Mueller. No discussion. 
Article 1 passed by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2: To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of the schools, for the 
payment of salaries of school district officials and 
agents, and for the payment of statutory obligations of 
the district. This article is exclusive of any other article 
on this warrant. The school board recommends one 
million, seven hundred eighty-seven thousand, eighty- 
three dollars ($1 ,787,083.00.) 

Moved by Helga Mueller, second by Sandra Rounds. No discussion. Article 2 
passed by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3: To raise and appropriate fifty-eight thousand, two 

hundred seventy-seven dollars ($58,277.00) to fund a full- 
time Reading Specialist at Piermont Village School as 
required in ED 306.15(a)(3) of Minimum Standards for 
School Approval. (The school board recommends this 
article.) 



102 



Abigail Metcalf Underhill moved the article, Roy Belyea seconded. 
Discussion. Glen Meder explained that the reading specialist is State 
Mandated and that the salary is based on a Masters Degree, level 10. 

Arnold Shields asked if the school would be reimbursed from the state and 
what the school would gain from having the specialist. Glen responded; we 
are not reimbursed for this position and that every elementary school in the 
state is required to hire a reading specialist. Superintendent Bruce Labs 
explained the minimum standards to comply with this mandate could be less 
than a full five day per week position. But that hiring a part time specialist 
might be very difficult. He feels that because all schools in the state also need 
to comply, that a shortage of those who qualify as a specialist is a big 
possibility. Bill Daley asked why the SAU was not thinking about hiring a 
specialist to share with other schools. Bruce said that Warren and Woodsville 
Elementary already have one and that the Bath School Board decided not to 
recommend hiring a specialist due to the cost. Principal Nancy Sandell said 
that in a perfect world having a full time reading specialist would be great. 
Special Education is the only resource that PVS has now for those children 
who need extra help with reading. Nancy explained that not only would the 
students benefit from the specialist but so would the teachers and support 
staff. She feels that reading help in the combination grade level classrooms 
that Piermont has would be beneficial due to the many different reading levels 
in each room. Tony Smith stood to talk about his son's discovery of reading 
and how excited he was when he finally understood the sounds that each 
letter made. He feels that a specialist is needed to set the building blocks for 
the children to grow from. Rebecca Ladd feels that phonics are the building 
blocks to success and that if they aren't in place early that the student will 
struggle in the upper grades. She feels strongly in favor of a reading 
specialist. George Smith doesn't feel that a specialist is needed stating that 
most students are reading at or above grade level and those below are part of 
the normal grade curve. He asked what other programs might be available to 
help students, besides a specialist. Nancy said that NWEA is currently being 
used at PVS, this is the second year. Arnold Shields, a 25 year English 
Teacher, stated that he himself never knew how to teach reading. He feels 
that every child deserves the best education possible and that offering a 
strong reading program with different teaching techniques will help all our 
children learn better. Chris Davidson says he is alarmed at the test scores. He 
asked the school board if the teachers are receiving ongoing training. Glen 
stated that they are. 

School Board Member Shawn Rogers said that the board did not want to add 
this $58,000 position to the budget as a line item. The reason being, so that 
they could explain to the tax payers that this reading specialist position is 
state mandated. He also explained that $58,000 is the high end of the salary 
needed to fund this position but that the possibility of finding other options to 
comply with the mandate might reduce this amount. For instance, if we could 
share with another school or if we are able to find someone for a part time 
position. Abigail Metcalf Underhill recalls trying to help her nieces with 
homework and how difficult it was to try to help them understand letter 
sounds. Terry Robie asked if the salary included all the benefit costs and 

103 



taxes, and the board confirmed that it does. Glen said that the board really 
feels that the school needs a reading specialist. Abby Metcalf agreed that one 
is needed saying that the math program is not a popular program with parents 
and some teachers but that it works. We need a reading program that also 
works. Bill Daley moved the article, Fred Shipman seconded. Article 3 passed 
by voice vote as written. 

ARTICLE 4: To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

George Smith asked for a sense of the house to see if anyone was interested 
in investigating the possibility of tuitioning out the seventh and eight grade 
students. He asked that if others felt it might be beneficial to students and or the 
school. Glen Meder responded that the cost would be a big increase and that he 
wasn't sure if it would benefit the students in any way. No interest was noted. 

Rebecca Ladd stated that she feels there is inconsistency in discipline. She 
feels there is still bullying going on and asked the school board if they had 
accepted Abby Metcalf s challenge presented to them at last year's meeting. 
She asked that this be a year of change. 

Tony Smith agreed with Rebecca, but feels that the school board needs help 
in this area. He would like to see parents get together and compile information 
for the board. The board could then review and address any concerns. 

Chris Davidson thanked Glen Meder, outgoing school board chair, for his 
service to the town and school. Glen was applauded. Vernon Jones 
presented a token of appreciation to Glen. 

Motion by Bill Daley to adjourn at 8:35 p.m., seconded by Abigail Metcalf 
Underhill. All in favor. 

Respectfully Submitted, Karen Fagnant 

School District Clerk 



Piermont School District 
Official Results of Voting on March 13, 2007 

School District Clerk: Karen Fagnant (161) 

Moderator: S. Arnold Shields (157) 

School Board: Abigail Metcalf Underhill (125) (Glen Meder 47) 

Treasurer: Frederick W. Shipman (168) 



104 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

2008 SCHOOL WARRANT 

THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



To the Inhabitants of the School District of Piermont, County of Grafton, State 
of New Hampshire, qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Old Church Building in said 
district on the 11 th day of March 2008, polls to be open for election of 
officers at 10:00 o'clock in the morning and to close not earlier than 
6:30 o'clock in the evening. 

ARTICLE 1 : To choose, by non-partisan ballot, a Moderator for the 
ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 2: To choose, by non-partisan ballot, a School District Clerk for 
the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3: To choose, by non-partisan ballot, a Treasurer for the 
ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 4: To choose, by non-partisan ballot, one School Board Member 
for a term of three years expiring in 201 1 . 



Given under our hands at Piermont this day of February 2008. 

Vernon Jones, Chairperson 
Shawn Rogers 
Abigail Underhill 
PIERMONT SCHOOL BOARD 



105 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

2008 SCHOOL WARRANT 

THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the inhabitants of the School District of Piermont, County of Grafton, State 
of New Hampshire, qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Piermont Village School in Piermont on 
the 18th day of March 2008, action on the Articles in this Warrant to be taken 
commencing at 7:30 o'clock in the evening. 



ARTICLE 1 : To hear reports of Agents, Auditors, Committees, or Officers 
chosen and pass any vote relating thereto. 

ARTICLE 2: To see what sum of money the district will raise and 

appropriate for the support of the schools, for the payment of 
salaries of school district officials and agents, and for the 
payment of statutory obligations of the district. This article is 
exclusive of any other article on this warrant. The school 
board recommends one million nine hundred thirty-one 
thousand eight hundred fourteen dollars ($1,931,814.00). 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the district will raise and appropriate up to two 
thousand dollars ($2,000) to be added to the previously 
established Special Education Expendable Trust, such 
amount to be funded from the year-end undesignated fund 
balance available on June 30, 2008. (The school board 
recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 4: To see if the district will raise and appropriate up to three 
thousand dollars ($3,000) to be added to the previously 
established Technology Trust Fund, such amount to be funded 
from the year-end undesignated fund balance available on June 
30, 2008. (The school board recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 5: To see if the district will raise and appropriate up to ten 
thousand dollars ($10,000) to be added to the previously 
established Tuition Trust Fund, such amount to be funded from 
the year-end undesignated fund balance available on June 30, 
2008. (The school board recommends this article.) 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the district will vote to offer choice for Piermont high 
school students to attend any accredited public secondary 
school or approved public academy as defined in RSA 194:27 
instead of the current policy that limits choice based on tuition 
cost. And further to raise and appropriate seventeen thousand 
dollars ($17,000) for the 2008-2009 school year for estimated 
increase in tuition costs. (The school board recommends this 
article.) 

106 



Note: This article is to ask voters if they want to offer choice to public schools and 
approved public academies (such as Thetford and St. Johnsbury Academy) for 
Piermont nigh school students regardless of the cost. The amount to be raised was 
calculated using the difference of the average tuition currently paid for the three core 
schools attended (Woodsville High School, Oxbow, and Rivendell) and the highest 
area tuition (currently Hanover) for 3 students. 

ARTICLE 7: To transact any other business that may legally come before 
said meeting. 



Given under our hands at Piermont this day of February 2008. 

Vernon Jones, Chairperson 
Shawn Rogers 
Abigail Underhill 
PIERMONT SCHOOL BOARD 



107 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Once again it is my pleasure to report on the educational progress and 
positive steps we have made in the past year, and the steps we will continue 
to make to improve the educational experience of our students. 

This year Paul Munn retired after many years as our Math teacher. We 
appreciate his services and wish him all the best. Nancy Sandell, who after 
four years as the Teaching Principal, decided that her true love was in 
teaching and has gone back to classroom full time. We were very happy she 
decided to stay at PVS to teach grades five and six. 

A new teacher evaluation document is being piloted in all the SAU 23 districts. 
This new document should help teachers develop their skills while at the 
same time focus teaching in the areas of need for our students. We are 
attempting to use test data to help in the direction of our instruction in the 
upcoming years. 

Developing our use of technology within the SAU continues and we have 
added to our capacity in each school. Due to the continued support of our 
taxpayers, our students enjoy the benefit of technological resources that 
enrich their educational experience. 

Each district in SAU 23 is currently updating their policies and we plan to 
finish this process by the end of 2008. After all the policies have been 
updated and approved by the School Board we will place them on our web 
site so the public will have easy access to them. This is a lengthy process, as 
each district has between 400-600 pages of policies to update. The entire 
process will take approximately two years to finish. 

During the 2007-08 school year each SAU 23 School Board will be 
developing goals. They will be targeting the areas they feel are most 
important in their own district and when the goals are complete they will be 
posted for all community members to review. 

I continue to be grateful for the support the taxpayers and community 
members have shown our schools and assure you that your support will never 
be taken for granted. The decisions on the direction of our programs will 
continue to be made with the best educational interests of our students and 
their future in mind. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bruce C. Labs 
Superintendent of Schools 



108 



ANNUAL PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 

I am pleased to submit the 2007 annual Piermont Village School report to 
you, the Piermont community. 

The Piermont community generously supported the curriculum embedded 
biennial Washington, DC trip for 28 students and parents in May 2007. 
Seventh grade student, Julian Grant won both the Geography and Spelling 
Bees. The annual all-school play, The Fisherman and His Wife, was produced 
with the expert help of a theater group in residence. The year culminated as 
nine students graduated from the 8 th grade in June: Patrick Chapin, Cody 
Erwin, Tiffany Henry, Meaghan Jones, Brendan Musty, Merry Noyes, Brian 
Priestley, Kara Veillette, and Zachary Whitaker. These students joined other 
Piermont Village School graduates at area high schools, bringing our current 
high school and vocational program enrollment to 50. 

New faces among the Piermont Village School staff for the 2007-2008 school 
year include: math teacher, Heather Caldwell; guidance teacher, Trish 
Griswold; reading specialist, Sue Martin; principal, Jonann Torsey; special 
education teacher, Cindy Valence; and, music teacher, John Whitney. While 
our Kindergarten enrollment declined to four students this fall, 12 additional 
students joined PVS in grades 1-8, bringing our current student body to 76. 

Validating school-wide literacy concerns last year, the Piermont community 
supported the added position of a reading specialist. Passionately working to 
turn-on reluctant readers to literature, our reading specialist has recruited 
readers of all ages, in towns near and far, to collect perfect reads for our 
students. Our teachers have joined together in a thorough review of our 
reading curriculum across the grade level during in-service times this fall, 
resulting in a clear focus on increasing phonemic awareness, phonics, 
fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. 

Supported by community insistence upon increasing student and teacher 
access to technology, as well as, state and SAU wide goals of improving 
teacher use of technology to support instruction, PVS is wired! Our 1 st -8 th 
grade classrooms are each newly equipped with mounted LCD projectors, 
and our math and grades 5-6 classrooms each have a SMART board. The 
addition of a second laptop cart nearly doubled the number of laptops 
available to students. Making progress on professional goals to integrate 
technology into the curriculum, teachers are using increased computer access 
daily to support student learning. 

Piermont School District goals, while in draft form, are gaining momentum. 

1. To increase individual student achievement using standardized test 
data to inform instruction. PVS proudiy realized great gains in student 
achievement as measured by the 2006 NECAP increases in both math 
and reading scores. Attesting to a clear focus on academic achievement 
as a school, these improvements were a step in the right direction. A 
portion of our professional development time this year is allocated to 

109 



developing teacher proficiency with "Performance Pathways" software, 
designed to support teacher's use of NECAP and NWEA student 
achievement data to inform instruction. As our capacity to utilize this tool 
increases, we will more adroitly adjust instruction to best meet the specific 
needs of individual students. 

2. To increase community understanding regarding the school budget and 
budget process through increased communication and information 
sharing. The discussion on this goal focuses on increasing 
communication with the whole town about school programs and 
budgeting processes and goals. 

3. To increase the standard of physical spaces within the building and 
school. Piermont Village School's beautiful physical plant is well cared for 
by the community. Improvements to playground safety and parking lot 
drainage would not have happened this fall without Piermont's lively spirit 
of volunteerism. The discussion on this goal focuses on maximizing the 
use of existing spaces through furniture and storage improvements and 
also through respectful scheduling. 

Piermont Village School Traditions 

Back To School Night, Whole School Hike, Pumpkin Carving for the Metcalf 
Farm Pumpkin Lighting, Halloween Party, Honor Roll Breakfast, monthly 
birthday celebrations, Holiday Food Drive, Concert and Stations Day, whole- 
school play, DC Trip, etc., contribute to the sense of community and 
expectation of rituals that excite and inspire all members of our school. 
Continuing to set a strong example of service and leadership across all 
grades, Student Council has painted the wall-ball board with a panther to be 
reckoned with, raised funds to support playground improvements, collected 
and distributed food for the Food Pantry, and decorated the school for the 
Holidays already this year. Serving alongside adult staff members on school 
committees, Student Council members are studying our discipline policy, 
nutrition and wellness, use of existing spaces, and safety procedures. Our 
staff members creatively and expertly organize and elicit support for these 
traditions; their tremendous experience is our priceless endowment. 

In Humble Gratitude 

My new role of teaching principal is as inspiring to me today as it was when 
Piermont first offered this challenge to me. Coming to school on a sweltering 
end of summer Saturday morning, seventeen community members 
volunteered to spread wood chips on our playground, and this outpouring of 
communitywide support for our school has been consistently strong over time. 
Thank you for serving and supporting your community school; your constant 
involvement in the daily life of our school makes our Piermont Village School 
exceptional. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jonann M. Torsey, Principal 

110 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Grade Five 
Erva Barnes* 
Dylan Gaudette* 
Jonathan Ratel* 
Kaylee Rogers* 

Grade Seven 
Alyvia Covert* 
Julian Grant* 
Zachary Klunder 
Peter Trapp 



Honor Roll 

Third Trimester 

2006-2007 



Grade Six 
Brendan Jones* 
Dalton Thayer 
Cooper Trapp* 
Jay Zeng* 

Grade Eight 
Patrick Chapin 
Tiffany Henry* 
Meaghan Jones* 



indicates students who were on the honor roll all three marking periods. 

In order to be named to the honor roll a student must be in grades five 
through eight and receive A's and B's in all subject areas, social adjustment 
and work habits. 



Scholarships 

Meaghan Jones - Bertha C. Manchester Award for Academics 

Meaghan Jones - Donna Drew Huntington Citizenship Award 

HeleMae Metcalf - Louise Scott Horton Award for Community Service 

Shannon Labs - St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY 



111 



SUPERINTENDENT'S ENROLLMENT REPORT 
2006-2007 



Number of Pupils registered during the year 78 

Average Daily Membership 72.0 

Percentage of Attendance 96.4% 



ENROLLMENT BY GRADES 



Grade 



K 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


Total 


9 


8 


7 


9 


7 


10 


8 


11 


9 


78 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 
STUDENTS TUITIONED TO OTHER DISTRICTS 
2006-2007 



Haverhill Cooperative* 12 26% 

Oxbow* 17 36% 

Hanover 1 2% 

Mascoma * 1 2% 

Rivendell 5 11% 

St. Johnsbury Academy 4 8% 

Thetford Academy* 5 1 1 % 

French Pond & King Street 2 4% 

TOTAL TUITION STUDENTS 47 100% 

* Have students attending Riverbend 



112 



PIERMONT VILLAGE SCHOOL 

TEACHER QUALITY REPORT 

2007-08 

Education Level of Faculty and Administration 
(In Full Time Equivalents) 





BA 


BA+15 


MA 


MA+15 


MA+30 


TEACHERS 


2.5 


1 


5.5 








ADMINISTRATION 








1 









Number of Teachers with Emergency/Provisional Certification - 

Number of Core Academic Courses Not Taught By Highly Qualified 
Teachers - 



PARENTS RIGHT TO KNOW 

As a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, or legal guardian, 
you have the right to know: 

1 . Who is teaching your child 

2. The qualifications and experience of your child's 
teacher(s) 

For information concerning your child's teacher(s), 
please contact the Superintendent's Office at: 

SAU #23 

2975 Dartmouth College Highway 

North Haverhill, NH 03774 

603-787-2113 



A copy of the Piermont Village School Title One Report Card 
is available at the school. 



113 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

BALANCE SHEET 

JUNE 30, 2007 



ASSETS 


ACCT 




Current Assets 






CASH 


100 


63,896.30 


INTERFUND RECEIVABLE 


130 


2,188.96 


INTERGOVERNMENTAL 






RECEIVABLES 


140 


2,878.88 


OTHER RECEIVABLES 


150 


729.28 


PREPAID EXPENSES 


180 


158.00 


OTHER CURRENT ASSETS 


190 




Total Current Assets 




69,851.42 



LIABILITY & FUND EQUITY 
Current Liabilities 

INTERFUND PAYABLES 400 

OTHER PAYABLES 420 3,045.74 

ACCRUED EXPENSES 460 938.20 

PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS 470 150.82 

DEFERRED REVENUES 480 

OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES 490 



Total Current Liabilities 




4,134.76 


Fund Equity 






RESERVE FOR ENCUMBRANCES 


753 


34,305.88 


RESERVED FOR SPECIAL 






PURPOSES 


760 




UNRESERVED FUND BALANCE 


770 


31,410.78 


Total Fund Equity 




65,716.66 



Total Liabilities and Fund Equity 69,851.42 

PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIP FUND 2007 

Beginning Value 1 .1 .07 $14,043.07 

Scholarships Awarded June 2007 $599.46 

Income Earned $627.67 

New Fund Donations: $ 0.00 

Ending Value 12.31.07 $13,941.27 

Beginning and ending values reflect market values of fund investments 

114 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 
BOND PAYMENT SCHEDULE 



Fiscal 

Year 

Ending 



Principal 



Interest 



Total 



2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 

TOTALS 



40,000 
40,000 
40,000 
40,000 
40,000 

200,000 



13,500 


53,500 


10,800 


50,800 


8,100 


48,100 


5,400 


45,400 


2,700 


42,700 



40,500 



240,500 



Audit Report 

The Piermont School District has been audited by the Plodzik 
& Sanderson Professional Association. Copies of the audit 
are available for public review at the Superintendent's Office 
at the James R. Morrill Municipal Building, North Haverhill, 
NH. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER 

For The 
Fiscal Year July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007 



SUMMARY 

Cash on hand July 1, 2006: 
Add receipts (including interest) 
Less 2005-06 School Board orders 
Balance on hand June 30, 2007: 



$75,882.17 
1,590,340.60 
1.602,426.47 
$ 63,796.30 



115 



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116 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT REVENUES 



GENERAL FUND 

770 Fund Balance (to reduce taxes) 



Revenue From Local Sources 

1111 Current Appropriation 

Interest on Investments 

Trust Fund Interest 

Refund from prior year 

Miscellaneous 

Transfer from Trust 
3000 Revenues From State Sources 
31 1 1 State Adequacy Grant * 

State Adequacy Tax 

School Building Aid 

Catastrophic Aid 

Vocational Tuition 

Transportation 



1510 
1511 
1980 
1990 
5252 



3112 
3210 
3230 
3241 
3242 



4000 Revenues From Federal Sources 

4580 Medicaid 

4810 National Forest Reserve 

TOTAL GENERAL FUND 

GRANTS 

4521 

TOTAL GRANTS 

FOOD SERVICE 

1610 Food Service Sales 
3260 State Reimbursement 
4560 Federal Reimbursement 
5221 Transfer from General Fund* 
TOTAL FOOD SERVICE 
SUBTOTAL BEFORE TRANSFERS 

Transfer to Trusts 
TOTAL BUDGET 

SCHOOL TAX RATE PER $1,000 



Local Education Tax 

State Education Tax 

TOTAL SCHOOL TAX RATE 

change from prior year 



2006-2007 


2007-2008 


2008-2009 




ACTUAL 


REVISED 


PROJECTED 


Jfc 


28,442 


31,411 


10,000 


(21,411) 


798,712 


941,026 


1,125,434 


184,408 


6,152 


4,500 


5,500 


1,000 


464 


- 


- 


- 


1,094 


- 


1,900 


1.900 


530 


800 


1,100 


300 


90,000 


83,390 


8,390 


(75,000) 


410,348 


430,865 


430,865 


. 


205,425 


203,798 


192,944 


(10,854) 


11,594 


12,679 


12,000 


(679) 


- 


4,003 


4,300 


297 


26,651 


35,788 


28,400 


(7,388) 


1,310 


951 


- 


(951) 


15,638 


12,000 


18,000 


6,000 


2,542 


2,268 


2,268 


- 


1,570,460 


1,732,068 


1,831,101 


99,033 


29,395 


38,339 


48,515 


10,176 


29,395 


38,339 


48,515 


10,176 


13,527 


13,000 


12,500 


(500) 


417 


400 


350 


(50) 


8,636 


8,600 


8,000 


(600) 


13,653 


21,542 


21,348 


(194) 


36,233 


43,542 


42,198 


(1,344) 


1,664,531 


1,845,360 


1,931,814 


86,454 


33,000 






- 


1,697,531 


1,845,360 


1,931,814 


86,454 


ACTUAL 


ACTUAL 


PROJECTED 


ACTUAL 


2006-2007 


2007-2008 


2008-2009 


Hz VALUATION 


8.80 


10.31 


12.33 


2.02 91,310 


2.29 


2.25 


2.13 


-0.12 90,463 



11.09 12.56 14.46 1.90 per $1,000 

1.47 1.90 



117 



PIERMONT SCHOOL BUDGET SUMMERY 







EXPENSES APPROVED 


PROPOSED 










2007-2008 


2008-2009 




OBJECT DESCRIPTION 


2006 -2007 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


+ OR(-) 


Fund: 


GENERAL FUND 










110 


PROFESSIONAL SALARIES 


334,715 


407,075 


448,132 


41057 


111 


ADMINISTRATIVE SALARIES 


3,368 


4,440 


4,440 





112 


SUPPORT STAFF SALARIES 


91,568 


95,344 


98,714 


3370 


113 


SUMMER SCHOOL SALARIES 


1,141 


1,800 


1,800 





120 


SUBSTITUTES 


14,768 


6,100 


6,400 


300 


122 


CO-CURRICULAR SALARIES 


1,895 


3,300 


2,500 


-800 


211 


HEALTH INS 


48,224 


76,433 


62,675 


-13758 


212 


DENTAL INSURANCE 


- 


. - 


3,696 


3696 


213 


LIFE INSURANCE 


273 


313 


239 


-74 


214 


DISABILITY INSURANCE 


1,043 


1,227 


1,087 


-140 


220 


PAYROLL TAXES 


34,278 


39,556 


43,800 


4244 


231 


EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT 


6,219 


8,145 


8,780 


635 


232 


PROFESSIONAL RETIREMENT 


10,432 


20,165 


24,954 


4789 


240 


TUITION REIMBURSEMENT 


5,052 


12,000 


15,350 


3350 


250 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. 


180 


380 


434 


54 


260 


WORKERS COMP 


2,885 


3,420 


3,133 


-287 


310 


SAU MANAGEMENT SERVICES 


67,791 


75,025 


70,270 


-4755 


320 


EDUCATION SERVICE 


46,675 


52,212 


56,411 


4199 


330 


OTHER PROF. SERVICES 


28,527 


29,565 


30,975 


1410 


411 


WATER & SEWAGE 


6,723 


10,000 


10,000 





421 


RUBBISH REMOVAL 


1,954 


1,800 


2,100 


300 


422 


SNOW REMOVAL 


2,260 


2,000 


2,300 


300 


430 


REPAIRS/MAINTENANCE 


18,552 


12,750 


11,750 


-1000 


432 


MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS 


2,897 


3,512 


3,175 


-337 


440 


RENTALS 


6,429 


6,018 


5,918 


-100 


490 


SECURITY 


625 


1,100 


1,100 





51.0 


STUDENT TRANSPORTATION 


36,103 


35,765 


38,005 


2240 


520 


LIABILITY INSURANCE 


4,569 


4,798 


4,364 


-434 


531 


TELEPHONE 


2,285 


2,200 


2,650 


450 


532 


DATA COMMUNICATIONS 


843 


850 


900 


50 


534 


POSTAGE 


893 


1,200 


1,200 





540 


ADVERTISING 


1,319 


2,500 


2,030 


-470 


550 


PRINTING 


- 


1,050 


1,050 





561 


TUITION/IN-STATE LEA 


172,304 


171,636 


163,981 


-7655 


562 


TUITION/OUT-STATE LEA 


346,853 


484,051 


503,542 


19491 


564 


TUITION - PRIVATE 


24,783 


41,352 


65,312 


23960 


580 


TRAVEL,LODGING,FOOD 


- 


550 


500 


-50 


610 


SUPPLIES 


14,572 


19,575 


21,300 


1725 


611 


MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES 


2,933 


5,000 


- 


-5000 


622 


ELECTRICITY 


10,925 


12,500 


12,000 


-500 


623 


PROPANE 


12,966 


15,000 


16,500 


1500 


640 


BOOKS 


5,219 


6,625 


7,000 


375 


650 


SOFTWARE 


3,868 


1,515 


1,136 


-379 


733 


ADDITIONAL FURNITURE 


4,245 


100 


- 


-100 


734 


ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT 


170 


2,000 


600 


-1400 


737 


REPLACEMENT FURNITURE 


473 


1,200 


2,250 


1050 


738 


REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT 


3,701 


1,150 


1.150 





810 


DUES/FEES 


6,096 


5,190 


6,050 


860 


830 


INTEREST 


13,500 


10,800 


8,100 


-2700 


890 


MISC. 


11 


250 


- 


-250 


910 


PRINCIPAL 


40,000 


40,000 


40,000 





930 


FUND TRANSFERS 


136,653 


21,542 


21,348 


-194 


TOTAL: 


GENERAL FUND 


1,583,758 


1,762,679 


1,841,101 


79,022 



118 



PIERMONT SCHOOL BUDGET SUMMERY 







EXPENSES APPROVED 


PROPOSED 










2007-2008 


2008-2009 




OBJECT DESCRIPTION 


2006 -2007 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


♦ OR(-) 


Fund: 


FOOD SERVICE- 21 










112 


SALARIES 


16,926 


17,224 


17,936 


712 


120 


SUBSTITUTES 


562 


- 


650 


650 


211 


HEALTH INS 


- 


5,760 


1,300 


-4460 


213 


LIFE INSURANCE 


22 


23 


18 


-5 


214 


DISABILITY INSURANCE 


44 


45 


38 


-7 


220 


FICA 


1,338 


1,318 


1,522 


204 


231 


EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT 


1,153 


1,505 


1,682 


177 


250 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. 


7 


20 


16 


-4 


260 


WORKERS COMP 


114 


122 


111 


-11 


430 


REPAIRS/MAINT. 


1,563 


1,000 


1,000 





580 


TRAVEL.LODGING.FOOD 


- 


100 


100 





610 


SUPPLIES 


880 


1,550 


1,550 





630 


FOOD 


13,592 


15,225 


15,225 





738 


REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT 


- 


1,000 


1,000 





810 


DUES/FEES 


32 


50 


50 





TOTAL: 


FOOD SERVICE- 21 


36,233 


44,942 


42,198 


(2,744) 


Fund: 


SPECIAL REVENUES- GRANTS- 


22 








110 


PROFESSIONAL SALARIES 


22,050 


31,319 


37,131 


5812 


211 


HEALTH INS 


3,715 


3,807 


5,819 


2012 


213 


LIFE INSURANCE 


10 


10 


12 


2 


214 


DISABILITY INSURANCE 


57 


60 


79 


19 


220 


FICA 


1,687 


1,788 


2,841 


1053 


232 


PROFESSIONAL RETIREMENT 


816 


1,355 


2,153 


798 


320 


PROFESSIONAL ED SERVICE 


741 


- 


- 





810 


DUES/FEES 


319 


- 


380 


380 


890 


MISC. 

SPECIAL REVENUES- GRANTS- 


- 


- 


100 
48,515 


100 


TOTAL: 


29,395 


38,339 


10,176 


Fund: 


FUND 70- TRUST FUNDS 










430 


CONTRACTED REPAIRS/MAINT. 


12,352 


- 


- 





561 


TUITION/IN-STATE LEA 

TRUST FUNDS 
BUDGET TOTAL 

Warrant Article # 3 


22,800 
35,152 


- 


- 





TOTAL: 













1,684,538 


1,845,360 


1,931,814 


86,454 








2,000 






Warrant Article # 4 






3,000 






Warrant Article # 5 






10,000 






Warrant Article # 6 






17,000 




GRAND TOTAL BUDGET AND WARRANT ARTICLES: 




1,963,814 





119 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT'S AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATOR'S SALARIES 

One half of the School Administrative Unit expenses are prorated among the 
school districts on the basis of adjusted valuation. One-half is prorated on the 
basis of average daily membership in the schools for the previous school year 
ending June 30. The Superintendent of SAU #23, during the 2007-2008 
school year, will receive a salary of $89,409.00. There is no Assistant 
Superintendent or Business Administrator position at SAU #23 at this time. 



The table below shows the pro-ration of the salary to each school district: 



Superintendent Salary 


Bath 


$11,176.13 


12.50% 


Benton 


$1,680.89 


1.88% 


Haverhill Cooperative 


$57,481.05 


64.29% 


Piermont 


$10,183.69 


11.39% 


Warren 


$8,887.24 


9.94% 


TOTAL 


$89,409.00 


100% 



120 



PIERMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

PREVIOUS TWO FISCAL YEARS PER RSA 32:1 1-a 

2005-2006 2006-2007 
Special Education Expenses 

1200 Special Programs 104,264 144,684 

1430 Summer School 2,203 2,621 

2 150/2 159 Speech and Audiology 16,352 13,224 

2162 Physical Therapy 

2163 Occupational Therapy 4,840 5,779 
2722 Special Transportation - 341 
Total Special Education Expenses 127,660 166,648 



Special Education Revenue 

31 10 Adequacy Funding SPED portion 

3240 Catastrophic Aid 

4580 Medicaid 

Total Special Education Revenue 



NET COST TO TAXPAYERS 30,391 94,606 

IDEA Entitlement Grant Funds 

Part A - Preschool 523 916 

Part B - Special Education 21,364 26,422 



56,405 


56,405 


19,547 


- 


21,317 


15,638 


97,269 


72,043 



121 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT #23 BUDGET SUMMARY 
POSTING FOR EACH CONSTITUENT DISTRICT PER RSA 194:C-10 



DEPARTMENT NUMBER / DESCRIPTION 
1 100 ITINERANT TEACHERS 

1230 FRENCH POND PROGRAM 

1231 KING STREET PROGRAM 

1430 FRENCH POND SUMMER SCHOOL 

1431 KING STREET SUMMER SCHOOL 
2120 ITINERANT GUIDANCE 

2150 SPEECH/LANGUAGE 
2210 CURICULUM/STAFF DEVELOPMENT 
2220 TECHNOLOGY SUPERVISION 
2311 SCHOOL BOARD 
2313 DISTRICT TREASURER 

2317 AUDIT 

2318 LEGAL COUNSEL 

2321 OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
2330 SPECIAL PROGRAMS ADMIN. 
2540 SAU-WIDE PUBLIC RELATIONS 
2620 BUILDING & RENT 
2640 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE & INS. 
2810 RESEARCH, PLANNING, DEVELPMT 
2820 NETWORK 
2830 RECRUITMENT 

SUBTOTAL GENERAL FUND 
IDEA GRANTS 
TOTAL BUDGET 



2007-2008 


2008-2009 




APPROVED 


APPROVED 


INCREASES/ 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


(DECREASES) 


139,580 


144,777 


5,197 


198,710 


209,907 


11,197 


149,449 


164,371 


14,922 


8,620 


11,110 


2,490 


- 


1,588 


1,588 


23,602 


25,871 


2,269 


207.436 


196,138 


(11,298) 


1,448 


1,133 


(315) 


79,312 


79,704 


392 


3,385 


1,632 


(1,753) 


2,718 


2,724 


6 


5,500 


5,500 


- 


500 


500 


- 


398,520 


405,627 


7,107 


151,469 


156,259 


4,790 


2,500 


2,100 


(400) 


21,800 


22,200 


400 


3,405 


6,980 


3,575 


2,000 


3,100 


1,100 


24,960 


27,902 


2,942 


300 


450 


150 


1,425,214 


1,469,573 


44,359 


263,841 


271,512 


7,671 



1,689,055 



1,741,085 



% increase = 



52,030 



3.1% 



DISTRICT ASSESSMENT TO BE SHARED 



658,688 



671,796 



13,108 



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